IIBEC 2020 Virtual International Convention and Trade Show

IIBEC 2020 Virtual International Convention and Trade Show

June 12-14, 2020

IIBEC’s premier annual event features 23 hours of educational seminars, live product demonstrations, and a two‐day virtual trade show.

Registration Open!

IIBEC 2020 Virtual International Convention and Trade Show
Attendee Registration Fees

Full Registration Fees
Member ……………………… $580
Nonmember ………………. $630

Single Day Registration
Member ……………………… $235
Nonmember ………………. $285

Student Registration
Member/Nonmember … $150

Trade Show Only Registration
Member/Nonmember … $75
(attendees only, not for exhibitors)

To email or mail completed forms with payment to:

IIBEC
1500 Sunday Drive, Suite 204
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
E-mail: ajohnson@iibec.org

Questions regarding registration?

Contact IIBEC at 800-828-1902 or info@iibec.org.

Join the list of Exhibiting Companies!

The IIBEC International Trade Show offers attendees the chance to meet and learn from representatives from manufacturers of roofing, waterproofing, and exterior wall products.

Attendees will earn 2.0 CEHs for spending up to four hours at the trade show. Attendees who spend more than four hours at the trade show will receive 3.0 CEHs.

IIBEC Member – $1,500

IIBEC Nonmember – $1,750

Join the list today. 

 

Acme Cone
A-LERT Roof Systems
American Hydrotech
American WeatherStar
Axis Building Envelope Design
Carlisle Construction Materials
CETCO
Derbigum
Detec Systems LLC
D.I. Roof Seamers
Dörken Systems Inc
Free Weekends
GAF
H.B. Fuller
Hyload
IB Roof Systems
International Leak Detection
IR Analyzers
JR Jones
Johns Manville
Master Builders Solutions by BASF
McElroy Metal
National Gypsum
National Women in Roofing
NRCA
Pecora Corporation
Polyglass
RCI-IIBEC Foundation
RoofersCoffeeShop
Rooftop Anchor
S-5! Metal Roof Innovations
Sika Corporation
Siplast
STI Firestop
SOPREMA
Thermal Bridging Solutions
TopHat Framing Systems
Tremco
United Gilsonite Laboratories
Wegener Welding LLC
York Flashings
Thank you to our Sponsors!

Join the list of sponsors today!

Platinum Sponsors

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Opening Ceremony and Keynote Speaker
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Gold Sponsors

SponsorSponsorship 
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AvailableTrade Show Prize Giveaway- 3 Available
AvailableRegion I Meeting
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Region III Meeting
AvailableRegion IV Meeting
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AvailableRegion VII Meeting
AvailableRegion VIII Meeting

Each year building enclosure industry professionals from across North America and abroad gather at the IIBEC International Convention and Trade Show to participate in over 17 hours of education covering the latest techniques and technologies in building enclosure design, repair, and maintenance. This year’s convention will be held in virtually, June 12-14, 2020.

IIBEC Continuing Educational Credit
All registered attendees will receive Continuing Educational Hours (CEHs) based on hourly attendance at educational programs and the trade show.

AIA Continuing Educational Credit
Educational presentations are registered to provide Learning Units for AIA members. Programs will provide 1 LU per hour of attendance and qualify for Health Safety Welfare (HSW)* credit.

Trade Show Continuing Educational Credit
Attendees will earn 2.0 CEHs for spending up to four hours on the trade show floor. Attendees who spend more than four hours at the trade show will receive 3.0 CEHs.

Listed below are the sessions that will be presented at the IIBEC 2020 Virtual International Convention and Trade Show.

Friday, June 12

Central Standard Time

Times subject to change.

Go With the Flow – Properties and Applications of Cold Fluid-Applied Waterproofing

9:00 AM  – 10:15 AM

Cold fluid-applied (CFA) waterproofing membranes are becoming popular products for difficult flashing details, exposed roofing, split-slab, and plaza waterproofing applications. Members of the design and construction community—including developers, owners, contractors, and design professionals alike—are becoming increasingly interested in these products for their sustainability, ease of installation, and safety. When appropriately specified and installed, CFA membrane products can provide reliable, durable, and low-risk waterproofing solutions, particularly in hard-to-detail transitions or areas with limited exterior access. However, even the most experienced industry professionals can find it challenging to navigate and select an appropriate membrane product, due to their limited track record, numerous manufacturers, and variety of product chemistries and product types.

Manufacturers typically publish testing data to assist professionals with their selection. However, testing is based on a variety of similar but different standards, making it difficult to compare membranes. Additionally, manufacturers typically publish testing of non-soaked samples, not considering the potential impact of in-service water absorption. To better understand and compare CFA membrane types, the authors conducted testing to evaluate water absorption properties of different dry samples, as well as puncture resistance and tensile strength properties of samples—both pre- and post-water absorption. They will discuss the benefits and challenges associated with CFA membranes, including the common and developing uses and detailing considerations. They will explain their testing methodologies, results, and findings.

Benjamin Hiltz

Benjamin Hiltz

Simpson, Gumpertz & Heger, Inc. | Washington, DC

Benjamin Hiltz is a member of his company’s building technology group, based in Washington, DC. His experience includes projects involving repair/rehabilitation design of existing enclosure systems, investigation of existing building enclosures, and new design. He has consulted with architects, contractors, and building owners on commercial and residential buildings.

Nicholas PiteoNicholas Piteo

Simpson, Gumpertz & Heger, Inc. | Washington, DC

Nicholas Piteo is a senior project manager based in Washington, DC. His experience in both building technology and structural engineering includes investigation of existing structures and building enclosures; rehabilitation design; and new design encompassing a variety of materials and systems, including below-grade waterproofing, windows, curtainwalls, metals, sealants, masonry, wood, stone, concrete, and other materials related to building enclosure construction. Piteo spends the majority of his work life analyzing issues with the building enclosure and developing solutions as part of new design consulting and investigation projects.

Performance Analysis of Aged TPO Membranes

9:00 AM  – 10:15 AM

New thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) roof membranes have been extensively analyzed in laboratories, roof farm fields, and under accelerated weathering conditions. The ASTM International material standard for TPO membranes has been improved since its inception to incorporate more demanding tested-product performance, including requirements for accelerated weathering and aging.

Industry data on the aged performance of TPO roof membranes to date have largely been based on laboratory work, regional studies (such as the 10-year study by the Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA), and anecdotal case studies of field-installed TPO roofs—predominantly those that have been improperly designed and/or installed, and membranes with formulations that resulted in premature failure.

Today, there are TPO roofs in the United States that have been in service for nearly 20 years. This paper will review the long-term performance of a large sampling of field-aged TPO roof membranes installed throughout the United States by evaluating thickness, flexibility, inspection under 7X magnification, and aged seam and repair weld adhesion. The intent of this study is to evaluate 1) field-aged TPO roof membrane performance and 2) the ability to repair field-aged TPO roof membranes.

Jennifer Keegan

Jennifer Keegan, AAIA

GAF | Parsippany, NJ

Jennifer Keegan is the director of building and roofing science for her firm, focusing on overall roof system design and performance. Keegan has over 20 years of experience as a building enclosure consultant specializing in assessment, design, and remediation of building enclosure systems. She provides technical leadership within the industry as the chair of the ASTM D08.22 Roofing and Waterproofing Subcommittee, and as an advocate for women within the industry as the educational chair for National Women in Roofing and a board member of Women in Construction.

Moisture Movement and Condensation Control in Exterior Wall Assemblies

9:00 AM  – 10:15 AM

Due to energy code changes, better enforcement, and as a matter of good practice, we are making buildings more and more airtight. Humidity and condensation control go hand in hand with mechanical ventilation of conditioned space. This presentation will focus on the increasing number of interior wall assemblies (and roofs) that are experiencing excessive condensation damage and specific cases that our team of forensic experts has observed over the past several years.

Understanding and predicting moisture movement within and through exterior wall systems is one of the most important factors affecting enclosure performance. Condensation issues can occur with or without designed air barriers, and it is important to understand the role ventilation plays in the design.

This presentation will include forensic studies of moisture movement and condensation control utilizing data loggers to measure moisture movement. The author will review WUFI® analysis of actual assemblies in actual buildings to understand how buildings behave in real-time versus design parameters. Discussion will include mechanical ventilation involved in condensation control, including make-up air versus exhaust. This presentation will also provide an analysis of code requirements versus actual system performance.

The nature of these failures includes design defects and failures related to changes the industry has made for energy efficiency, including cost-cutting measures and system design issues.

Karim P. Allana

Karim P. Allana, RRC, RWC, PE

Allana, Buick & Bers, Inc. | Palo Alto, CA

Karim P. Allana is the CEO and senior principal of his firm. He earned a B.S. in civil engineering from Santa Clara University and is a licensed professional engineer in California, Hawaii, Nevada, and Washington. Allana has been in the A/E and construction fields for 30+ years, specializing in forensic analysis and sustainable construction of roofing, waterproofing and the building enclosure. He has acted as a consultant and expert witness in 450+ construction defect projects, as lead plaintiff or defense expert, or in defense of subcontractors and manufacturers. He is a frequent speaker and presenter at professional forums.

Simplifying the Complicated Process of Wind Design for Roof Systems

3:00 PM – 4:15 PM

Wind design for roof systems is rather complicated, and with the latest version of ASCE 7, it has become that much more confusing. Different editions of building codes and, therefore, different versions of ASCE 7 are used in different parts of the country. The three versions that are currently in use are ASCE 7-05, 7-10, and 7-16. While each provides a method to determine the wind loads acting on a building, the specifics of each method vary. There are also groups (e.g., FM, NRCA) that provide methods to determine the wind loads acting on a roof. Once loads are determined, a roof system with a tested resistance greater than the loads is chosen for use. If it were only that simple!

The presentation will discuss the similarities and differences between the three versions of ASCE 7 and the roofing industry-developed methods to determine loads. The presenters will provide insights regarding the application of the traditional Factor of Safety in various design methods, as well as design enhancements for improved long-term performance. Lastly, the presentation will take a deep dive into the numerous listing services that provide wind-uplift-rated roof systems, such as FM, UL, and SPRI.

Joan Crowe

Joan P. Crowe, AIA

GAF | Northbrook, IL

Joan P. Crowe holds a bachelor of science degree in architectural studies and a master of architecture degree from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. In 1988, she began her career at Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc. In 2000, Crowe joined the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) working in the technical services section. Starting in 2016, she joined GAF as manager of codes and regulatory compliance. Her responsibilities include monitoring building codes, standards and regulations; providing technical assistance to the sales and marketing departments; and producing technical documents. Crowe is a licensed architect in Illinois and a member of the American Institute of Architects.

James Kirby

James R. Kirby, AIA
GAF | Wilmette, IL

James R. Kirby is a building and roofing science architect with his firm. He has a master of architecture degree with a “structures” option. With over 25 years of experience in the roofing industry, covering low-slope, steep-slope, metal, SPF, vegetative, and rooftop photovoltaics, he understands the effects of heat, air, and moisture on a roof system. Kirby presents building and roofing science information to architects, consultants, and building owners, and writes articles and blogs for building owners and facility managers and the roofing industry. He is a member of AIA, ASTM, ICC, MRCA, NRCA, IIBEC, and USGBC.

Air Force Academy Cadet Chapel:

Mocking-Up the Reclad Design of an Icon

3:00 PM – 4:15 PM

The Air Force Academy Cadet Chapel—an iconic and landmarked structure—has experienced water leakage since it was built in 1963. The unique skin on the repeating tetrahedrons is sloped, with exterior water drainage and management behavior somewhere between a wall and a roof. This study will review the existing detailing conditions resulting in water leakage. A reclad design was developed to incorporate a new weather-resistant panel backup wall and inboard metal cladding panels matching the existing historical appearance. The building science principles governing the design development are examined. To evaluate the design, a laboratory mock-up was constructed and performance tested. Challenges related to acquiring and constructing the custom repair design skin assemblies for a full-scale laboratory mock-up will be reviewed. Performance testing of the design included rounds of air, water, thermal, and structural load testing. Lessons learned from the performance testing and the resulting design modifications will be presented.

William O’Brien

William O’Brien, Jr., REWC

William O’Brien has performed façade assessments, investigations (including leakage, condensation, stack effect, and failure), repair design, and enclosure commissioning and consulting. These projects primarily include glass curtainwalls and windows, metal panel, masonry, and precast concrete systems on various structures—from hospitals to high-rises. His research publications from Pennsylvania State University were dedicated to advancing understanding of the seismic performance of glass curtainwalls and storefronts. He has also authored papers on condensation control from air transport in cold climates.

Bruce Kaskel

Since joining WJE in 1985, Bruce Kaskel has investigated and designed repairs for distress conditions in existing buildings. He has authored papers on exterior façade materials, glass and façade testing, the history of glazing systems, and structural failures of walls. He has presented seminars on aluminum and glass curtainwalls, exterior wall systems design and repairs, and lessons learned from cladding failures. Kaskel has guest lectured at Purdue University, Illinois Institute of Technology, and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He led WJE’s design effort on the recladding of the U.S. Air Force Academy Chapel as part of the AECOM team starting in 2015. The project is now under construction with anticipated completion in 2021.

Air Barriers Meet NFPA 285 – Burning Issues

3:00 PM – 4:15 PM

The relationship between the air barrier/water-resistive barrier and NFPA 285 (Standard Fire Test Method for Evaluation of Fire Propagation Characteristics of Exterior Wall Assemblies Containing Combustible Components) compliance is often misunderstood. We propose to add clarity by going beyond the standard misconception that one must consider NFPA 285 requirements only if the building is taller than 40 feet. While not necessarily new, the issues are broadly misunderstood, and assemblies not compliant with the building code are too often specified unknowingly.

Based on the authors’ in-depth synthesis and analysis of information from a wide array of sources and experts, they will examine in detail the effects of insulation and cladding choices as they relate to selection of the water-resistive barrier (WRB), as well as the membrane’s location within the wall system. This will be supported using real project detail drawings and specifications. In addition, manufacturer NFPA 285 compliance documentation, which can be difficult to interpret, will be examined for design and field use.

Peter Barrett

Peter Barrett
Dörken Systems, Inc. | Beamsville, ON, Canada

Peter Barrett is the product manager and marketing manager for his company, where he has been employed for over a decade. His involvement with the design community and building materials industry spans over 25 years. Barrett holds a BA (Hons.) from Queen’s University and an MBA from Wilfrid Laurier University, and currently serves on the board of directors for the Air Barrier Association of America (ABAA) and on its Audit Committee. He has also contributed to The Construction Specifier, Construct Canada, Tunnel Business, and Masonry Magazine.

Marcus Jablonka

Marcus Jablonka
Dörken Systems, Inc. | Beamsville, ON, Canada

Marcus Jablonka has been vice president of his firm for nearly 10 years. He is a voting member of the ABAA Technical Committee and the ASTM E06 Committee on Performance of Buildings. He is also a member of the National Institute of Building Sciences (NIBS) and the Building Enclosure Technology and Environmental Council. Until December 2016, he served as president of the Building Envelope Moisture Management Institute (BEMMI). He holds a mechanical engineering degree from the University of Paderborn, as well as a graduate degree in business administration from the University of Bochum, Germany. Jablonka has contributed to many industry publications, including Interface.

Saturday, June 13

Central Standard Time

Which is the Weakest Link – How Can it Be Stronger? Lessons Learned From 20 Years of Hurricane Investigations

LIVE (Tentative) 12:00 PM – 1:15 PM

As insurance claims increase, wind-induced failure is a major concern for building enclosure designers. To understand the weakest links on the roof assembly, the Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues (RICOWI) launched a Wind Investigation Program (WIP) in 1996. WIP missions are as follows:

  1. To investigate the field performance of roofing assemblies after major wind storm events
  2. To factually describe roof assembly performance and modes of damage
  3. To formally report the results for substantiated wind speeds

Keys to the RICOWI investigations are teams that are balanced, unbiased, and trained in wind damage assessment. Teams typically are made up of a manufacturer, a roof consultant, and a university or insurance organization representative. Several WIP investigations have been completed over the past 20 years. This presentation focuses on the performance of low-sloped roofs. Among others, three weak links were found critical in the failure of the roofing systems, namely:

  • Securement of roof edges
  • Role of rooftop equipment
  • Integration of roof/wall interface

Each of the above weak links is scientifically analyzed, followed by field observation. Correlations are developed for roof wind design. In addition, wind design data from the North American codes of practice are also calculated and compared to show the impact of science and field observation on durable roof design. With these illustrations, this paper offers recommendations to advance the roof system design for hurricane-prone regions.

Appupillai BaskaranAppupillai (“Bas”) Baskaran, PhD, PEng
National Research Council Canada | Ottawa, ON, Canada

Bas Baskaran is a group leader researching the wind effects on building enclosures through experiments and computer modeling. As an adjunct professor at the University of Ottawa, he also supervises grad students. As a professional engineer, he is a member of RICOWI, IIBEC, ASCE, SPRI, ICBEST, and CIB technical committees. He is a research advisor to various task groups of the National Building Code of Canada and a member of ASCE’s Wind Load Committee. He has authored over 300 research articles and received over 25 awards, including the Canadian Roofing Contractors Association’s Frank Lander Award and ASTM’s Carl Cash Award. Dr. Baskaran was recognized by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II with a Diamond Jubilee medal for his contribution to fellow Canadians.

David RoodvoetsDavid L. Roodvoets
DLR Consultants | Montague, MI

David L. Roodvoets is an independent consultant and a past chairman of RICOWI, technical director of SPRI, and on the board of directors of the Cool Roof Rating Council. He was previously employed as an associate development scientist for the Dow Chemical Company and technical director for the T. Clear Corporation. Roodvoets has worked with major research institutions and conducted extensive wind tunnel testing of roofing systems. Recently, he has worked on developing fire and wind standards for vegetative roofs, ventilation requirements for attics and cathedral ceilings, and hurricane investigations by RICOWI. He has presented at IIBEC symposia and published in industry magazines.

Retaining Talent Through Coaching and Mentoring

9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

Building enclosure consultants are often in the position of training and/or supervising an employee, teaching a facility manager about roof system maintenance and forensics, explaining to a building owner or HOA board why a seemingly simple enclosure issue is actually quite complex, and working collaboratively with contractors to problem-solve and get work done quickly. As we enter the longest period of uninterrupted growth in the construction industry, building an inclusive culture amidst diverse project teams benefits one’s professional practice and reputation. Supporting female employees on the rooftop, at the wall, or in the office is critical to reducing employee turnover. Creating a collaborative culture that is supportive of women is also beneficial to all employees and colleagues.

Future leaders are entering the workforce with the expectation that coaching, mentoring, and emotional intelligence are a basic skillset among their colleagues and managers, so there is a need and value for consultants to possess and utilize these skills to successfully retain a future workforce. Organizations without deep knowledge of these topics risk plummeting employee retention rates.

Content will be provided by a professional coach knowledgeable about the building enclosure consulting industry and supplemented by IIBEC members.

Jennifer Keegan

Jennifer Keegan, AAIA
GAF | Parsippany, NJ

Jennifer Keegan is the director of building and roofing science for her firm, focusing on overall roof system design and performance. Keegan has over 20 years of experience as a building enclosure consultant specializing in assessment, design, and remediation of building enclosure systems. She provides technical leadership within the industry as the chair of the ASTM D08.22 Roofing and Waterproofing Subcommittee, and as an advocate for women within the industry as the educational chair for National Women in Roofing (NWIR) and a board member of Women in Construction.

Jennifer Stone

Jennifer Stone, GRP, LEED AP
Johns Manville | Denver, CO

Jennifer Stone, with preferred accounts at her firm, is a founding member and executive chair of NWIR. She has also run operations for a large commercial roofing contractor. Her specific focus with NWIR is recruiting women into the roofing trade and, more importantly, speaking out on how to retain women by empowering them. One of the many aspects of retaining any diversity within our industry is mentoring, which she has focused on for the past several years. Her knowledge of the industry—from operations to manufacturing—helps her to lead real-world discussions that translate to action-based steps to be implemented.

Ellen Thorp

Ellen Thorp, CAE
National Women in Roofing | Westminster, CO

Ellen Thorp, executive director of NWIR, has over 20 years of experience working with college students, new professionals, corporate executives, and volunteer member leaders in business coalitions and trade and professional associations on issues ranging from government relations to strategic planning to program implementation. A Southerner transplanted to Washington, D.C., she blends an intuitive and positive-oriented approach to motivate people and an East Coast assertiveness to “get stuff done,” with the ultimate goal of a completed project, program, or initiative that meets the identified objectives and serves the needs of the organization’s members.

Applying Recent Building and Energy Code Advancements for Durable and Energy-Efficient Building Enclosures

9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

Energy codes have advanced in recent years—in large part by requiring more efficient building thermal enclosures. This advancement typically requires more insulation or a more strategic and effective use of insulation, such as continuous insulation on exterior walls. Regardless of the insulation methods and materials used for compliance, this change has altered how water vapor and bulk water must be managed to maintain or even improve durability. Consequently, long-standing building code “rules” for moisture management are no longer reliable or, at best, are rendered incomplete. Fortunately, very recent building code advancements for water vapor control, including some related improvements for bulk water management, have answered this call to better coordinate with the prior energy code advancements. This paper and presentation will highlight and explain these coordinated energy code and building code advancements, including relevant substantiating research. It also will provide guidance for and examples of their effective application for design and construction of code-compliant, durable, and energy-efficient building enclosures.

Jay Crandell

Jay Crandell, PE
ARES Consulting | Shady Side, MD

Jay Crandell has over 30 years of experience in construction, engineering, and innovative building technology research for private- and public-sector clients. He has conducted benchmark studies of major natural disasters, as well as research to address significant structural, energy, and building science challenges. His work has helped to propel many innovative technologies into the international codes and consensus standards. He is widely published on various engineering, construction, and building science topics.

Stuccometrics: Stucco Jointing – The Why, When, Where, and How

9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

Exterior stucco cladding can be categorized into one of two configuration types—either directly-applied to cementitious and masonry substrates (barrier walls), or applied over lathing that is mechanically fastened over a water-resistive barrier to steel- or wood-framed substrates (drainage walls). Both configurations often employ a range of stucco cladding jointing types serving different functional and aesthetic purposes. The objective facts of Why and When stucco jointing is needed or not needed, Where joints are needed, and How joints are designed and constructed are explored, including significant new information that promotes knowledge and understanding to improve the performance and quality of stucco claddings, which are often misunderstood.

This article is based on historical development, design, and installation requirements; building code and reference standard requirements; and the results of recent stucco jointing performance testing. Provided illustrations will depict stucco jointing construction detailing, lathing accessories, splicing, intersection and termination requirements, and plaster application methods used to configure stucco jointing. This presentation factually and objectively explains essential requirements and considerations for effective stucco jointing to assist stucco cladding designers and craftsmen. Jointing facilitates drainage, accommodating building substrate movement and cement plaster shrinkage movement, thus reducing cracking, while it terminates cement plaster panel areas and has decorative purposes.

Jeff Bowlsby

Jeff Bowlsby, CCS, CCCA
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger, Inc. | San Francisco, CA

Jeff Bowlsby is an architect and stucco consultant with 35 years of construction industry experience. He leads the ASTM C1063 Installation of Lathing and Furring for Portland Cement-Based Plaster task group and founded and leads the ASTM C11 Stucco Work Group that develops all ASTM stucco-related industry standards. He has completed performance testing of stucco assemblies and components, published several stucco-related technical articles in national industry professional journals, is the author of the stucco information resource StuccoMetrics.com, and is a frequent industry presenter on stucco wall claddings. Bowlsby is skilled in building science issues and the integration of all building enclosure systems and components.

Copper Wall Cladding: Modern Testing for Time-Proven Systems

3:00 PM – 4:15 PM

Copper–due to its inherent longevity, adaptability, and beautiful natural weathering characteristics̶̶–remains one of the most proven and preferred roofing and flashing materials. With increasing adoption of light-gauge sheet metal as wall cladding, today’s design professionals are again looking to copper to provide a high-performance option for key buildings.

Until now, some specifiers were reluctant to specify copper; although time-proven, a lack of recognized system testing for common traditionally formed copper wall systems proved a deterrent for some professionals.

The Copper Development Association (CDA) recently completed an exhaustive testing program encompassing the battery of tests included within the American Architectural Manufacturer Association (AAMA) 509, Drained and Ventilated Rain Screen standard.

Completed test protocols include:
• Air infiltration (ASTM E283)
• Water infiltration (ASTM E331)
• Wind resistance (ASTM E330)
• Dynamic wind (AAMA 501.1)

Tested Systems:
• Standing seam (double lock)
• Standing seam (single lock)
• Flat seam (long panel)
• Flat seam (diagonal orientation)

This presentation outlines tested systems, performance characteristics with sample wind resistance in different regions, availability of test results, and concludes by proposing system modification, should a building require even higher performance.

Larry Peters

Larry E. Peters
Copper Development Association, Inc. | McLean, VA

Larry Peters is the CDA’s project manager for the testing component of its Wall Cladding Initiative. He has nearly 25 years of experience working with architectural metal wall cladding, roofing, and flashing systems. Over 20 years of this experience has been dedicated to copper systems. This includes technical assistance during initial design, as well as troubleshooting and forensic analysis of installed systems. Peters also manages CDA’s Installation Training Program and is thus skilled at hands-on techniques necessary to install traditional copper cladding systems and related flashing.

Frank Resso

Frank V. Resso, PE
Resso Engineering, LLC | Sharpsburg, GA

Frank Resso has over 25 years of experience in engineering and design encompassing virtually every segment of the building construction industry. He is a licensed engineer with a special emphasis in the design, specification, product testing, and forensic investigation of building enclosure systems, exterior wall cladding, and roofing systems. He recently participated as a member of the ASCE 7-16 Wind Loads Subcommittee and various SPRI Canvas Groups, and was a longstanding member of the ASTM Committee E06 on Performance of Buildings. Russo has presented numerous short courses on metal cladding, building enclosures, and roof edge systems and is credited with nine U.S. patents on related systems.

Glass Breakage in Insulated Glazing Units in Spandrel Assemblies

3:00 PM – 4:15 PM

Curtainwall and window wall systems today commonly use insulating glass units (IGUs) for vision glazing and for spandrel panel cladding. A risk for IGU in insulated spandrels is higher thermal stresses on the glass lites, compared to older approaches with single glazing. When ceramic enamel (frit) opacifiers are used, there is increased stress from solar absorption. Thermal stress is generally addressed by heat-treating at least the opacified lite. Multiple incidences of thermal stress-related fracture of ceramic enameled spandrel glass in North America, Europe, and elsewhere have shown that ceramic enamel weakens glass, reducing the added benefit of heat treatment, so there remains a risk of in-service thermal stress breakage.

This presentation will give examples of breakage, describe causes, show results of a test program that shows ceramic enamel reduces the strength of heat-treated glass, and describe options to control the potential for in-service breakage. The discussion will be of interest to building owners, designers, and builders considering the use of curtainwall and window wall systems with opacified glass.

George Torok

George P. Torok, CET, BSS
Morrison Hershfield Corporation | Ottawa, Ontario

George Torok is a façade specialist in the façade engineering team of his firm’s Ottawa, Ontario, office. He provides specialist consulting services to architects, building owners, developers and builders, and façade system manufacturers across Canada and the U.S. He has over 30 years of experience in new building enclosure design and construction and existing building performance failure investigation, rehabilitation, and renewal. His specialty is fenestration systems, including windows, doors, skylights, curtainwalls, window walls, sloped glazing, and glazed architectural structures. He is a past president of the Ontario Building Envelope Council and the Building Envelope Council Ottawa Region, and a director of the Building Science Specialist Board.

Specifying Fenestration – Understanding the Consultant’s Purpose in the Process

3:00 PM – 4:15 PM

A testing technician from an accredited field-testing lab is onsite and is reviewing the project documents when he notices that the windows do not meet or exceed the building design pressure. He identifies the problem, determining that 200 windows must be removed and 800 windows on the project must be rejected, costing the project months and several hundred thousand dollars. With a proper understanding of the code requirements, this could have been avoided.

This presentation will cover the current practice and how it is flawed. It will explore the requirements for the International Residential Code (IRC) and the International Building Code (IBC) as they pertain to fenestration product certification. The speaker will specifically delve into the IBC 2012 and the newer section 1710, which requires that all windows and sliding glass doors be tested to conform to the North American Fenestration Standard (NAFS). The question, “What does this actually mean?” will be answered. This will be compared to the code requirements for storefronts/curtainwalls.

The presenter will look at the NAFS, fenestration specifications, and building design pressures based upon an ASCE-7 calculation, and complete the presentation by answering the question, “What is the role of the building enclosure consultant in this process?”

Ron Doddridge

Ron Doddridge, FMPC
Designs by Arielle | Daytona Beach, FL

Ron Doddridge holds a B.S. in architecture and mechanical engineering, as well as in business/religion. He has 24 years of experience in fenestration and building enclosure consulting. Most recently, Doddridge completed his professional certification as an AAMA Fenestration Master, of which there are currently only 105 in the world.

Sunday, June 14

Central Standard Time

Defining the Ultimate Wall Through Testing

9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

The building industry is bombarded with new and improved materials with everybody saying they are the best. How do you know? How do you choose? Do you need the best material available? This presentation walks you through a new means to define what the ultimate wall is for your project. Every building is unique, and the old “one size fits all” does not work anymore. This new approach allows you to customize the ultimate wall for your project using anybody’s materials.

Laverne Dalgleish

Laverne Dalgleish
Air Barrier Association of America | Walpole, MA

Laverne Dalgleish has been involved in the construction industry for over 30 years and has focused on improving the quality of construction, both on improving materials and the processes for installation. He spends a great deal of time in codes and standards and works with the building enclosure industry to produce standards that are useful to the industry and allow for choice of materials for a specific project.

First Line of Defense – Plaza Waterproofing Replacement

9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

Outdoor plazas are ubiquitous on the urban landscape, providing access to otherwise limited outdoor space. Due to tight urban space demands, plazas are often located above occupied spaces, which complicates their design and maintenance. In addition, as plaza systems age, plantings and trees can become overgrown, hardscapes worn and deteriorated, and failing waterproofing can result in interior leakage and damage. Maintenance and repairs are generally difficult because of the overburden and multi-layer systems, and so frequently the systems are either partially or completely replaced. Replacement is often complicated given perimeter constraints, changed code requirements, and constructability issues. In addition, the plaza system selection must consider life expectancy, durability, maintenance, and cost.

This presentation will provide strategies to evaluate plaza system replacement options within project-specific restrictions through a series of case studies. It reviews investigation strategies to evaluate existing plaza conditions and the field information critical for making design decisions. A range of replacement plaza waterproofing options and their advantages and disadvantages, including durability, constructability, and cost implications will be discussed. Key design considerations, such as drainage, overburden selection and setting, and building code requirements that can impact the material selection and overall system detailing will be presented.

Casey Williams

Casey Williams, PE
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger, Inc. | Boston, MA

Casey Williams is a senior staff II member in the building technology group of her firm. She has been involved with the investigation and remedial design of building enclosures, as well as the subsequent construction administration of repairs, including the New York State Capitol, the Massachusetts State House, and the First Church of Christ Scientist. Her focus is on existing and historical building investigation and repair projects.

Look Out Below – A Curtainwall Case Study

9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

Curtainwall systems have been used in commercial construction since the 1970s. Though the performance of these systems has improved, there is still much to learn about how design choices affect service life resilience. This presentation will discuss the fundamentals of commercial fenestration system types, performance, and proper detailing followed by a case study illustrating how these concepts were applied. The case study of Clements University Hospital, a fully operational 12-story healthcare facility, illustrates how typical detailing of newly incorporated elements could have adverse long-term effects.

Beauty caps on a typical captured glass curtainwall system were falling and posed a life safety risk to the public. Walter P Moore was engaged to perform a peer review of the construction documents to identify possible causes of failure, as well as a visual survey to identify additional falling hazards. The Challenging Access Team mobilized to conduct the visual assessment of the tower curtainwall system by rope access. By implementing quality control processes for the repairs, performing hands-on observations, and examining the installed repairs, repair solutions would mitigate future falling hazards, as well as reduce risks for the owner and building patrons. These and other challenges encountered throughout assessment, design, and construction oversight will be discussed.

Jacqueline Byndas Prakhov
Walter P Moore & Associates, Inc. | Dallas, TX

Prakhov is a graduate engineer in the Diagnostics Group of Walter P Moore. She has more than three years of experience in the field of forensic engineering. Her expertise includes evaluating and designing repairs for distress related to clay masonry, stone façades, concrete structures, building enclosure moisture management, roofing systems, and below-grade waterproofing on concrete substrates. She has also developed work scopes, repair details, repair procedures, and technical specifications for waterproofing, restoration, and rehabilitation projects.

Jason Siwek

Jason Siwek, PE
Walter P Moore & Associates, Inc. | Washington, DC

Jason Siwek is a project manager in the diagnostics group of his firm. With more than eight years of experience in the building enclosure field, Siwek has gained expertise in unitized curtain walls, punched windows, storefronts, canopies, skylights, and handrails. His experience involves formulating test procedures to determine material properties, evaluating performance conditions, and recommending efficient processes for repair. Siwek has special insight into international building codes, standards, and market trends based on his work with global design teams. In the building enclosure industry, he specializes in enclosure fabrication and rope access assessments.

Legal Import of Inconsistent Design Specifications and Manufacturer Warranties

9:00 AM – 10:15 AM

Various issues can arise when design specifications are inconsistent with or contradict warranty requirements on a typical design-bid-build (DBB) project. In the typical DBB project, there are contractual rights and obligations created between the owner and the architect and the owner and the contractor, but not between the architect and the contractor. This dynamic can often lead to situations where the design specifications actually void the manufacturer’s warranty.

This presentation will focus on three primary topics: 1) the delivery of warranty-compliant design specifications, 2) the legal rights and recourses available to owners, designers, specifiers, and manufacturers when the specifications are inconsistent with the warranty requirements, and 3) what courts have ruled when faced with situations involving inconsistent design specifications and warranty requirements.

How the legal system has treated ambiguous and/or uncertain terms between the project specifications and the warranties provided will be discussed. The potential impacts of unclear contract documents, including greater liability exposure and financial risk, will be presented. Best practices to avoid the potential consequences of voiding a manufacturer warranty will also be provided.

Brian Must

Joshua D. Baker
Metz Lewis Brodman Must O’Keefe, LLC | Pittsburgh, PA

Josh Baker has represented roofing manufacturers and contractors in alleged roofing failure and contractor error disputes. He also has experience with overall claims management, including policies and procedure development and writing effective warranties.

Josh Baker

Brian T. Must
Metz Lewis Brodman Must O’Keefe, LLC | Pittsburgh, PA

Brian Must has spent the past 20 years representing manufacturers, building owners, design/build firms, engineers, and contractors in the commercial roofing industry. He has represented various roofing entities in claims or litigation involving hospitals, schools and universities, government buildings, and high-rise condominiums. His experience ranges from negotiating and resolving commercial roofing claims and lawsuits to trying cases before federal and state courts and commercial arbitrations.

Physical Testing for Wind Resistance of Retrofit Single-Ply Roof Systems Over Structural Metal Panel Roof Systems

10:30 AM – 11:45 AM

Retrofit single-ply roof systems (RSPRS) are increasingly being used to re-cover existing structural metal panel roofs. One of the primary concerns when an RSPRS is installed over a structural metal panel roof is wind uplift. Of significant concern is when an RSPRS is mechanically fastened into every other purlin instead of every purlin. The “every other” type of installation changes the wind-resistance load path of the metal building. This every other load path seemingly doubles the load on the purlin-to-main-frame connection for the purlins to which the RSPRS is attached.
ASTM E1592 physical testing has been performed on three test roof assemblies—each consisting of a mechanically attached TPO with flat stock and flute-fill polyisocyanurate over a 24-in.-wide structural metal panel roof system. Each RSPRS has different fastener patterns, which resulted in different wind uplift resistance values. The tests were heavily monitored to obtain deflection measurements and stress/strain information for multiple components within the assembly.

The results from an analysis of the three physical tests will be presented. The results from physical testing (small and large scale) were used to develop finite element analysis (FEA) modeling of alternative fastening patterns, and these conclusions will be presented.

Mohamed A. ElGawady

Mohamed A. ElGawady, PhD
Missouri University of Science and Technology | Rolla, MO

Mohamed A. ElGawady, Ph. D., is a Professor and Benavides Faculty Scholar at Missouri University of Science and Technology (formerly University of Missouri-Rolla) with 20 years of experience in extreme loading and sustainability.

James Kirby

James R. Kirby, AIA
GAF | Wilmette, IL

James R. Kirby holds a master of architecture degree with a structures option, and is a licensed architect concentrating on building and roofing science. He has over 25 years of experience in the roofing industry, covering low-slope, steep-slope, metal, SPF, vegetative, and rooftop photovoltaics. He understands the effects of heat, air, and moisture on a roof system. Kirby presents building and roofing science information to architects, consultants, and building owners, and publishes articles and blogs for building owners and facility managers and the roofing industry at large. He is a member of AIA, ASTM, ICC, MRCA, NRCA, and IIBEC.

Infrared Thermography: The Detective in Your Toolbox

10:30 AM – 11:45 AM

Infrared thermography is a non-invasive testing method for detecting infrared energy radiated from building surfaces. Its ability to identify thermal patterns indicative of heat loss and trapped moisture enables the accurate location of compromised building enclosures and roof assemblies. This presentation will examine the capabilities and limitations of thermography, as well as the conditions required to attain useful results for scanning walls and roofs. The presenters will use case studies that exhibit the benefits of infrared thermography as an investigative tool, referencing images that show solid examples of challenges and eureka moments. Practical examples from real projects will help attendees learn how a thermographer’s ability to interpret images—and not necessarily the caliber of the equipment—drives a successful analysis. The objective of this presentation is to demonstrate how a comprehensive understanding of the equipment, thermodynamics, and building enclosure systems is required to generate quality results and how a lack of understanding can lead to completely different conclusions.

Harry Koyle

Harry W. Koyle, RRO
Wapiti Inspections | Calgary, AB, Canada

Harry Koyle is the owner of Wapiti Inspections, based near Calgary, AB. With over 35 years of experience in the roofing and building enclosure industry, he has extensive experience in all fields related to these important components of a building. Koyle is a Registered Roof Observer, an ARCA Approved Inspector, and a Certified Infrared Thermographer. He is a charter member of the IIBEC Canadian Prairies Chapter and has served on the executive committee of the Alberta Building Envelope Council for six years.

Josh Baker

Stephanie M. Robinson, PEng
WSP Canada, Inc. | Ottawa, ON, Canada

Stephanie Robinson is the manager for the building sciences team of her company’s Ottawa, ON office. She has 11 years of experience in investigation, design, contract administration, and construction review of building enclosure components for new and existing construction in Canada and the United States. Robinson leads technical decisions for roofing and cladding projects across Canada and manages her firm’s Roofing Centre of Excellence, a national team that connects the roofing business by sharing knowledge, managing internal company processes and documents, and promoting industry reputation. She is a Level 2 Certified Thermographer.

Detailing Specific Cladding Requirements for Mid-Rise Wood-Framed Buildings

10:30 AM – 11:45 AM

Multistory, wood-framed buildings are ubiquitous in modern construction throughout North America, particularly for multifamily residential construction, but also for light commercial. Specific cladding problems can occur if special attention is not given to appropriately detail these building enclosure interfaces. This paper and presentation discuss the causes for these problems, the lack of existing development currently existing within the industry, and the need for such detailing for various cladding types. The current state of the industry does not formally recognize or address the issue of shrinkage and elastic shortening of the vertical members within these structures.

Warren French

Warren R. French, F-IIBEC, RBEC, PE
French Engineering, LLC | Spring, TX

Warren R. French is a registered professional engineer in 20 states, as well as a Registered Building Enclosure Consultant (RBEC) through IIBEC. He has extensive experience with design peer reviews, as well as numerous forensic investigations pertaining to exterior cladding systems for hundreds of mid-rise, wood-framed, multifamily residential projects.

A Decade of Change: Recent Revisions to ASTM Stucco Standards

10:30 AM – 11:45 AM

Although stucco has been in use for centuries, standards regarding its design and application were not developed until the early part of the twentieth century. Over time, these standards have been modified in response to changing needs, developments, and expectations within the industry. Revisions to stucco-related ASTM standards have accelerated over the past ten years in particular, changing the standards drastically. This paper will summarize the most significant of these changes and discuss the genesis and reasons for them. It will also examine areas of future progress on the standards anticipated over the coming decade.

Patricia Aguirre

Patricia M. Aguirre, REWC, PE, CDT
Bristow, VA

Patricia Aguirre a building enclosure consultant in northern Virginia. Her work focuses on forensic field and laboratory investigations; façade and building enclosure investigations; structural inspection, analysis, and design; architectural retrofit and repair; and development of design documents and repair recommendations. Aguirre is an active member of IIBEC, serving on the REWC Exam Committee and teaching several exterior wall-related courses. She also serves on ASTM C11 Committee on Gypsum and Related Building Materials and Systems.

Matthew Innocenzi

Matthew Innocenzi, RBEC, PE
Nick Innocenzi & Sons Consulting Engineering and Associates, LLC | Warrenton, VA

Matthew Innocenzi is principal of his firm. He has 20 years of experience as an engineering consultant, with a focus on litigation support and expert testimony for building enclosure systems, particularly light-gauge metal framing, Portland cement stucco, brick veneer systems, steep-slope roofing materials, and waterproofing. Innocenzi is also an active member in ASTM C11 and D08 committees on Gypsum and Related Building Materials and Prepared Roofing Systems, serving as chairman and technical contact for ASTM C926, Standard Specification for Application of Portland Cement-Based Plaster and ASTM C1860, Standard Test Methods for Measurement of Tensile Strength or Bond Strength of Portland Cement-Based Plaster by Direct Tension task groups.

Why Fenestration, Why? Water Testing Problems and Solutions

1:45 PM – 3:00 PM

New construction and renovation projects provide their own set of unique challenges, especially during the installation and integration of new fenestrations systems (e.g., sliding glass doors and windows). The focus of this paper will seek to analyze both similar and distinctive modes of water penetration failure that have been observed during multiple sessions of water testing performed in general accordance with accepted industry standards. This paper will further analyze and discuss the water testing failures related to detail design and constructability issues associated with work performance and project management, using several case studies. Applying the learned knowledge of water penetration failures during the design and installation of fenestration systems of new or renovation projects will lead to improved performance and life expectancy of the building enclosure as a whole.

Wayne Butler

Wayne Butler, AIA
Applied Building Sciences, Inc. | North Charleston, SC

Wayne Butler’s architectural design practice focuses on building enclosure design, consulting, and diagnostic testing for a variety of architectural projects. The emphasis of his work has been in the hot/humid, high-wind/high-seismic zone of the Southeast. Wayne received both his B.S. and masters in architecture from Clemson University. Wayne is past chair and current board member of the Building Enclosure Council|Charleston, served on the Building Enclosure and Environmental Council – BETEC Material & Innovation Committee, is an active voting member of ASTM E06, Performance of Buildings, and a board member and mentor with Architecture, Construction, and Engineering’s (ACE’s) Mentor Program of America (Charleston Affiliate).

John Wylie

John C. Wylie, REWC, PE
Construction Science and Engineering, Inc. | Westminster, SC

John C. Wylie has over ten years of experience as an engineering consultant and engineering intern, primarily in the areas of deficient construction, structural analysis, and collapse/damage investigations. Wylie is licensed as a professional engineer in four states and a Registered Exterior Wall Consultant with IIBEC. He is responsible for the inspection and structural analysis of a wide variety of building enclosure and framing systems, including roof, wall, and guardrail systems. Wylie has provided deposition testimony during a litigation case, and has presented several technical papers at national and regional conferences. He is a member of IIBEC’s Interface Editorial Board.

Conventional Roof Assemblies: An Update to a Five-Year Field Monitoring Study

1:45 PM – 3:00 PM

A long-term field monitoring study has measured the impacts of membrane color and insulation strategy on the in-situ performance of conventional roof assemblies. The same roof membrane cap sheet type with three different surface colors (white, gray, and black) was installed over three different conventional insulation strategies with approximately the same R value, creating a total of nine unique roof assemblies on the same building. Sensors were then installed to monitor key performance indicators for the roofs, including temperature at key layers of the roofs, relative humidity within the assemblies, and solar reflectance of the roof membranes.

This paper presents the results of this monitoring work after five years of study. In particular, updates and further analysis are presented with respect to moisture movement and accumulation within the assembles, insulation performance, and long-term reflectivity and soiling of the roofing membranes. Exploratory openings are also to be performed to confirm results of the monitoring and collect samples for laboratory testing of the roofing materials post field exposure. The various measurements are analyzed and synthesized to allow for discussion of advantages and disadvantages of the different membrane colors and insulation arrangements.

Lorne Ricketts

Lorne Ricketts, PEng
RDH Building Science | Burnaby, BC, Canada

Lorne Ricketts is a building science specialist concentrating on new buildings, forensic investigations, and research work. His broad experience includes enclosure and façade design consulting, field review, building monitoring and testing programs, energy assessments, and product testing and development. Ricketts takes an active role in industry education and has produced numerous technical guidance and research documents as well as spoken at conferences and industry events across North America.

Façade Access and Fall Protection – Designed Systems or Afterthought?

1:45 PM – 3:00 PM

The rules and regulations governing safety requirements for workers exposed to occupational hazards associated with walking-working surfaces are often misunderstood by building owners, design consultants, employers, employees, and third-party contractors. Owners are not always clear what is required, and traditional design consultants are often not comfortable specifying these systems. Due to this issue, façade access and fall protection systems frequently become an afterthought instead of being included in pre-design discussions and considerations.

This presentation will discuss the regulations and industry best practices associated with façade access and fall protection systems. It will also address the role of the design consultant in specifying these systems and recommended methods to streamline coordination challenges among the parties.

A façade access case study for the Las Vegas Convention Center project will be presented to demonstrate the benefit of early coordination. With 120-foot-tall curtainwalls at the 220-foot-wide porte cochere, 60-foot-tall curtainwalls along the remainder of the 600-foot-long building front, and a continuous undulating ribbon overhang that extends 8 to 12 feet from the exterior face of the building, designing systems for routine façade access and maintenance of the center was a challenge. The case study will highlight the successful processes used by the design and construction team to produce safe, efficient, and OSHA-compliant access at elevated building areas.

Kimani Augustine

Kimani Augustine, PE
Walter P Moore & Associates, Inc. | Houston, TX

Kimani Augustine is a senior associate and senior project manager at his firm’s Houston office. He has been in the engineering industry since 2004 and has experience in diversified aspects of enclosure diagnostics consulting, including conducting field visits and assessments of existing structures requiring retrofit or renovation. He has led efforts on a wide variety of building enclosure, façade access, and parking restoration projects. Augustine has also managed several significant building enclosure renovation projects involving rope access and building façade maintenance unit assessments, certification, and retrofits.

Jeffrey Kobes

Jeffrey Kobes
Walter P Moore & Associates, Inc. | Dallas, TX

Jeffrey Kobes is a senior associate and senior project manager at his firm’s Dallas office. Kobes specializes in services related to the assessment, repair, and expansion of existing and historical buildings, including the building enclosure issues associated with existing buildings. He utilizes his experience with historical buildings to develop thoughtful approaches to façade access and maintenance for both existing and new buildings. He is a member of the Association of Preservation Technology and Preservation Dallas and serves on the Structural Engineers Emergency Response Committee for the Structural Engineers Association of Texas.

Learn From Experienced, Field-Tested Experts

IIBEC’s expert instructors offer more than just technical data. Presenters reinforce program content with practical examples from applications in the field. With plenty of opportunities to ask questions, you get the answers you need. Instructor/attendee dialogue is encouraged.

Geared towards building enclosure professionals, architects, engineers, contractors, and facility managers, this program is invaluable to anyone involved with maintaining or designing building envelope systems.

Over 17 hours of education, Saturday and Sunday Trade Show sessions, and numerous social and networking opportunities await attendees of the IIBEC 2020 Virtual International Convention and Trade Show, June 12-14, 2020.

Plan your attendance with the day-to-day list of activities below.

Emerging Professionals
Programs tagged with the “EP” designation  include content identified as likely to be particularly insightful for “Emerging Professionals” or for those newly developing a building enclosure consulting career.

Pre-Convention Region Meetings

Times are in Eastern Daylight Time

RegionTimeRegister Link
Region IJune 2, 2020 – 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM EDTRegister
Region IIJune 3, 2020 – 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM EDTRegister
Region III – Sponsored by H.B. Fuller

June 4, 2020 – 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM EDTRegister
Region IVJune 5, 2020 – 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM EDTRegister
Region VJune 8, 2020 – 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM EDTRegister
Region VIJune 9, 2020 – 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM EDTRegister
Region VIIJune 10, 2020 – 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM EDTRegister

Schedule (subject to change) – Times are in Central Standard Time

Friday, June 12

TimeEventEP
9:00 AM – 10:15 AMGo With the Flow – Properties and Applications of Cold Fluid-Applied Waterproofing
Performance Analysis of Aged TPO Membranes
Moisture Movement and Condensation Control in Exterior Wall Assemblies
10:15 AM – 12:00 PMDedicated Trade Show Hours
12:00 PM – 1:30 PMWelcome Ceremony and Keynote Presentation – A.B. Stoddard – LIVE SESSION
1:30 PM – 3:00 PMDedicated Trade Show
1:30 PM – 2:00 PMProduct Demonstration  – Available
2:00 PM – 2:30 PMProduct Demonstration  – Siplast
2:30 PM – 3:00 PMProduct Demonstration – Available
3:00 PM – 4:15 PMSimplifying the Complicated Process of Wind Design for Roof Systems
Air Force Academy Cadet Chapel: Mocking-Up the Reclad Design of an Icon
Air Barriers Meet NFPA 285 – Burning Issues

Saturday, June 13

TimeEventEP
9:00 AM – 10:15 AMRetaining Talent Through Coaching and Mentoring
Applying Recent Building and Energy Code Advancements for Durable and Energy-Efficient Building Enclosures
Stuccometrics: Stucco Jointing – The Why, When, Where and How
10:15 AM – 12:00 PMDedicated Trade Show Hours
10:30 AM – 11:00 AMProduct Demonstration  – Available
11:00 AM – 11:30 AMProduct Demonstration  – Available
11:30 AM – 12:00 PMProduct Demonstration  – Available
12:00 PM – 1:15 PMLIVE Session
1:15 PM – 3:00 PMDedicated Trade Show Hours
3:00 PM – 4:15 PMSpecifying Fenestration – Understanding the Consultant’s Purpose in the Process
Glass Breakage in Insulated Glazing Units in Spandrel Assemblies
Copper Wall Cladding: Modern Testing for Time-Proven Systems

Sunday, June 14

9:00 AM – 10:15 AMDefining the Ultimate Wall Through Testing
Look Out Below – A Curtainwall Case Study
Legal Import of Inconsistent Design Specifications and Manufacturer Warranties
First Line of Defense – Plaza Waterproofing Replacement
10:30 AM – 11:45 AMInfrared Thermography: The Detective in Your Toolbox
Physical Testing for Wind Resistance of Retrofit Single-Ply Roof Systems Over Structural Metal Panel Roof Systems
Detailing Specific Cladding Requirements for Mid-Rise Wood-Framed Buildings
A Decade of Change: Recent Revisions to ASTM Stucco Standards
12:00 PM – 1:30 PMLIVE Session
1:45 PM – 3:00 PMWhy Fenestration, Why? Water Testing Problems and Solutions
Façade Access and Fall Protection – Designed Systems or Afterthought?
Conventional Roof Assemblies: An Update to a Five-Year Field Monitoring Study

A.B. Stoddard – Political Outlook

Associate Editor and Columnist, RealClearPolitics

A.B. Stoddard is an associate editor and columnist with political news site and polling data aggregator RealClearPolitics, and a contributor and guest host for SiriusXM’s POTUS Channel. She appears regularly on Fox News Channel, Fox Business Network, CNN, and MSNBC for her expertise as a political commentator. She is a former associate editor and columnist for The Hill newspaper. Her column with The Hill won first-place Dateline Awards from the Society of Professional Journalists’ Washington, D.C. chapter in 2010 and 2011.

Nonpartisan, Stoddard addresses elections and the political landscape of the day. Frequently meeting with sources and politicians of all stripes, Stoddard has her finger on the pulse of Washington, D.C. as she offers detailed and smart political and electoral analyses. Her talks cover the biggest stories in the news, the most up-to-date happenings between Congress and the White House, ongoing budget battles, and the electoral prospects for the two parties.

Stoddard had always wanted to be a reporter, and she caught the political bug watching Justice Clarence Thomas’s Supreme Court nomination hearings. She began her journalism career as a reporter for the Potomac News in northern Virginia, and she has covered the U.S. Congress since 1994 as a reporter at The Hill and a Senate producer for ABC News. She returned to The Hill as a commentator and columnist in 2006.

The Annual Golf Tournament will not be taking place in 2020 due to the IIBEC 2020 International Convention and Trade Show being held virtually.

The Spouse/Guest room and events will not be taking place in 2020 due to the IIBEC 2020 International Convention and Trade Show being held virtually.

Stay Connected

Want to stay connected to what all is going on at the 2020 IIBEC International Convention and Trade Show? The 2020 IIBEC Convention app is ready for download from your devices app store so you can start planning your days now!

New Features on the 2020 Convention App:
Interactive Floor Map
The floor map for the 2020 IIBEC Convention and Trade Show is fully interactive. Browse through the list of exhibitors, then add an exhibitor to your favorites or map it and see exactly where the exhibitor is.

Take Notes within the App
Take your notes on your phone or tablet and email the notes to yourself when you are done. The notes are associated with a company, exhibitor, or an educational session.

Plan Your Day(s)
From any section, add the event to your planner so you don’t miss any important sessions or events.

Digital Survey
After each educational session, open the survey for that particular session and complete the survey. How easy is that?

 

The 2020 IIBEC Convention and Trade Show app can be downloaded on your app store. Search IIBEC 2020 Convention to download.

May 11, 2020
In order to allow us to hold an event and still comply with social distancing guidelines, IIBEC has pivoted to present the 2020 International Convention and Trade Show as a virtual event. All 24 previously planned cutting-edge educational sessions, an opening session, and a virtual trade show will be provided. All attendees previously registered for the annual convention in March 2020 will automatically be registered for the live virtual event June 12-14, 2020. Attendees will have access to the virtual education and trade show until July 15, 2020, to allow extended time to view every education session offered during the virtual event.


March 12, 2020

After careful consideration of the impact of the global COVID-19 outbreak and our priority for the health and welfare of our members and staff, the IIBEC Executive Committee has decided to postpone the 2020 International Convention and Trade Show in Houston, Texas, on March 26–31.

We are working with our partners regarding options and potential dates for the future. More information will be provided as soon as it is available.

Reservation cancellations from Marriott Marquis Houston will automatically be sent to the email the hotel has on file for you.

This was a difficult decision; however, the safety of our members, attendees, and their families is our primary concern and responsibility. We appreciate your patience and understanding as we work through the logistics associated with this decision.

If we are already registered for the 2020 Convention, are we automatically registered for the virtual convention? 

Yes 

How do I access the technical program content (educational sessions)

All registrants will receive detailed instructions and login information approximately a week prior to convention start date of June 12.  If your registration included the educational content, you will be able to click the sessions you wish to attend once you are logged into the virtual platform.

Will there be a 2021 IIBEC International Convention & Trade Show?

Yes! The 2021 IIBEC International Convention & Trade Show  is scheduled for March 4-9, 2021, at the  Sheraton Phoenix Downtown and the Phoenix Convention Center, Arizona.

Can I use Continuing Education Hours (CEHs) from the virtual convention and tradeshow? If so, can I carry forward or back CEHs from this virtual program?

Attendees are eligible to receive up to 26 continuing education hours (CEHs) from the 2020 virtual convention and tradeshow. Attendees will be able to enjoy all the education classes offered this year from the convenience of their home, office, or mobile device. There are 23 technical education sessions and each course will earn 1 IIBEC CEH. Attendance at the virtual trade show will earn up to 3 CEHs. Registrants can carry half of their annual CEH requirement forward each year and can carry unlimited CEHs back to the previous year. NOTE: CEHs for trade show attendance can only be earned during the live trade show hours on June 12-13.

For example, if a registrant obtains 20 CEHs in 2020 from the virtual convention and tradeshow, and holds the RRC, RWC, or REWC designations, that individual can use 12 CEHs for 2020 requirements, apply 6 CEHs towards 2021 requirements, and can carry back the remaining 2 CEHs for 2019 (if needed).

How does a virtual trade show work? 

A virtual trade show is accessed easily with your computer, phone, or tablet, whereby attendees and exhibitors connect via live chat when visiting booths. Much like the in-person trade show, you choose from booths to visit and can ask questions or request private conversations with representatives. Within the booth, you can view exhibitor materials, such as documents or videos, and chat with the representatives attending the booth. Representatives will be available for chat in the booths on June 12-13 during the trade show hours. After the live dates, the booths will remain available to you through July 15 as part of your registration. While a representative may not be available for chat in the booth during the extended days, you will be able to submit questions or request additional information by simply sending a message from inside the booth.

If the virtual convention is actually June 12-14, what content will be available through July 15? 

June 12-14, the virtual convention will be “live” – there will be live presentations, attendees will be networking using the chat feature, certain presenters will be answering Q&A while their sessions are in progress, and the exhibit booths will have representatives available during trade show answers to provide additional information and to answer questions. From June 15-July 15, the recorded educational sessions (23 of them) will be available to view on demand and the trade show booths will still be “open” so that visitors can view the information and contact a representative.

How does the value of my registration translate from the in-person to the virtual convention and trade show?

The virtual event will provide the same level of exceptional education and exhibition that you have come to know at the IIBEC convention and trade show. Your experience will net a greater opportunity to view all educational sessions while obtaining your needed continuing educational hours and professional development as well as interaction with exhibiting companies.  And, you will enjoy 30 additional days to consume the sessions and visit booths at your leisure, as these materials will remain available through July 15! As a virtual event, the opportunity is also cost saving to the individual/employer as attending requires no airfare, hotel, and per diem expenses.

What does a virtual education room look like?

Think of a virtual platform as any other website.  It provides links to click to get you to the information you want to see.  In this case, that webpage has been designed to look like a conference room or auditorium.  Once you login and click the link for the room you need, you will see links for the sessions you want to view and the chat function to “talk” with other attendees in the same room.  The virtual platform can host many registrants during any one presentation.

Is there a video to explain how to use?

We will be adding more information to the IIBEC website clearly explaining how to access the site, how to navigate to the events you want to attend, and what you can expect to see.

 How many CEHs may I earn at the virtual Convention? 

Each educational session is worth 1 IIBEC CEH and you will have access to view educational sessions through July 15, 2020. You may earn 2 CEHs by spending up to 4 hours at the Trade Show. You may earn 3 CEHs by spending over 4 hours at the Trade Show.  

May I transfer my full registration to the 2021 IIBEC International Convention and Trade Show (March 4-9, 2021 in Phoenix, Arizona)? 

Yes, that is an option for individuals who are currently registered. If you would like to transfer your registration to the 2021 IIBEC International Convention & Trade Show, please send your request to ajohnson@iibec.org. 

May I apply my registration fee to any IIBEC purchases (symposium, education course, membership renewal, publication)? 

Yes, if you’d like to do that please send your request to ajohnson@iibec.org. 

 May I be refunded for my registration? 

Yes, we are offering refunds, there is a 10% processing fee applied to your refund. Please send refund requests to ajohnson@iibec.org. 

 Why is the registration fee the same price for the virtual as the in-person Convention? 

The virtual Convention provides access to all educational sessions, which is not possible at the in-person Convention. Access to educational sessions will be available virtually through July 15, 2020.  

Will I be refunded for golf? 

Yes, all golf registrations and club rentals if applicable will be fully refunded as there will not be a golf tournament in 2020. 

What about my spouse registration? 

Spouse registrations will be fully refunded as well as spouse tour(s): Painting Class and/or George Ranch. 

 

 

When do we have to let IIBEC know if we accept the proposed package? 

May 8, 2020 

How do I access the technical program content (educational sessions)

All registrants will receive detailed instructions and login information approximately a week prior to convention start date of June 12.  If your registration included the educational content, you will be able to click the sessions you wish to attend once you are logged into the virtual platform.

Will there be a 2021 IIBEC International Convention & Trade Show? – both Attendee & Exhibitor FAQ Tabs

Yes! The 2021 IIBEC International Convention & Trade Show  is scheduled for March 4-9, 2021, at the  Sheraton Phoenix Downtown and the Phoenix Convention Center, Arizona.

Are we able to make change out exhibitor reps?

Yes, please contact Ashley Johnson at ajohnson@iibec.org

Do Trade Show Complimentary Reps need to register themselves so they can attend trade show and/or education?

No, if you were registered to attend the in-person event convention and trade show, you remain registered to attend the virtual event to include education.

Can Trade Show Additional Reps attend education?

No, the same registration status applies, with one exception, refunds will be made for anyone registered as an “additional rep” at $75.00. Trade Show Additional Reps may rep the booth at trade show only and may not attend education.

Can I use Continuing Education Hours (CEHs) from the virtual convention and tradeshow? If so, can I carry forward or back CEHs from this virtual program?

Attendees are eligible to receive up to 26 continuing education hours (CEHs) from the 2020 virtual convention and tradeshow. Attendees will be able to enjoy all the education classes offered this year from the convenience of their home, office, or mobile device. There are 23 technical education sessions and each course will earn 1 IIBEC CEH. Attendance at the virtual trade show will earn up to 3 CEHs. Registrants can carry half of their annual CEH requirement forward each year and can carry unlimited CEHs back to the previous year. NOTE: CEHs for trade show attendance can only be earned during the live trade show hours on June 12-13.

For example, if a registrant obtains 20 CEHs in 2020 from the virtual convention and tradeshow, and holds the RRC, RWC, or REWC designations, that individual can use 12 CEHs for 2020 requirements, apply 6 CEHs towards 2021 requirements, and can carry back the remaining 2 CEHs for 2019 (if needed).

How does a virtual trade show work? 

A virtual trade show is accessed easily with your computer, phone, or tablet, whereby attendees and exhibitors connect via live chat when visiting booths. Much like the in-person trade show, you choose from booths to visit and can ask questions or request private conversations with representatives. Within the booth, you can view exhibitor materials, such as documents or videos, and chat with the representatives attending the booth. Representatives will be available for chat in the booths on June 12-13 during the trade show hours. After the live dates, the booths will remain available to you through July 15 as part of your registration. While a representative may not be available for chat in the booth during the extended days, you will be able to submit questions or request additional information by simply sending a message from inside the booth.

If the virtual convention is actually June 12-14, what content will be available through July 15? 

June 12-14, the virtual convention will be “live” – there will be live presentations, attendees will be networking using the chat feature, certain presenters will be answering Q&A while their sessions are in progress, and the exhibit booths will have representatives available during trade show answers to provide additional information and to answer questions. From June 15-July 15, the recorded educational sessions (23 of them) will be available to view on demand and the trade show booths will still be “open” so that visitors can view the information and contact a representative.

How does the value of my registration translate from the in-person to the virtual convention and trade show?

The virtual event will provide the same level of exceptional education and exhibition that you have come to know at the IIBEC convention and trade show. Your experience will net a greater opportunity to view all educational sessions while obtaining your needed continuing educational hours and professional development as well as interaction with exhibiting companies.  And, you will enjoy 30 additional days to consume the sessions and visit booths at your leisure, as these materials will remain available through July 15! As a virtual event, the opportunity is also cost saving to the individual/employer as attending requires no airfare, hotel, and per diem expenses.

What does a virtual education room look like?

Think of a virtual platform as any other website.  It provides links to click to get you to the information you want to see.  In this case, that webpage has been designed to look like a conference room or auditorium.  Once you login and click the link for the room you need, you will see links for the sessions you want to view and the chat function to “talk” with other attendees in the same room.  The virtual platform can host many registrants during any one presentation.

Is there a video to explain how to use?

We will be adding more information to the IIBEC website clearly explaining how to access the site, how to navigate to the events you want to attend, and what you can expect to see.

Who will design the booth? 

IIBEC will provide a portal login for the booth and you will be choosing a template to work from. The below booths are examples from previous trade shows using the software IIBEC will be using. 

When will gain access to the booth portal? 

We will contact you when booth portal becomes available. 

Will we be uploading our own information to the booth? 

Yes, you will be uploading all data to your booth portal. 

Will there be dedicated Trade Show hours? 

Yes. Those hours are being determined as we refine the schedule. 

Will there be a live chat option? 

Yes. There will be a live chat within the booth. You will be able to chat with everyone within the room at one time and have one-on-one chats. 

Do I have to have someone available for chat every day, all day? 

No, outside of the trade shows designated hours, your live chat will turn into an email that will go to whomever you would like. 

How many days will the trade show be live? 

The trade show will open on June 12, 2020 and the main show days will be June 12-15.  However, all of the virtual content will be live and available until July 15.  After June 15, if an attendee wants to reach an exhibitor it will be done via email.  

How will an attendee get to the trade show? 

The attendee will click on the trade show icon at the bottom of every screen to take them directly to the trade show virtual floor.  

IIBEC LogoContinuing Educational Hours from IIBEC
Attendees can earn up to 26 Continuing Educational Hours (CEHs) from IIBEC.

Pending LU/HSW Units from American Institute of Architects.

IIBEC’s knowledgeable instructors offer more than just technical data. Presenters offer relevant solutions referencing examples from applications in the field. You get the answers you need.

98% of attendees polled described IIBEC educational events as worthwhile and said they would attend future programs.

Offering over 30 educational programs each year, IIBEC is a leader in roofing, waterproofing and building envelope technology education.