Registration Now Open

To receive the IIBEC member rate, you must renew or join prior to registering for the conference. IIIBEC membership is not required to register, but you are required to create a non-member profile prior to registering. Full registration includes all networking events, breakfast, and lunches.

The session recordings package is available for purchase to full registrants. Please note these recordings are not eligible for continuing education credits.

Register here.

Early Registration Rates Extended.

Category Member Rate
IIBEC*
Nonmember Rate
Full-Conference Attendees $590 $790
Student ** $175 $175

**To be eligible, you must be a full time student of an engineering, architectural, or construction management or similar discipline. You must provide a copy of a valid student ID or other proof of full-time status. To register as a student, call 800-828-1902.

Payment: You may complete your online registration with one of the following payment methods: American Express, MasterCard, Discover, or Visa.

If you are unable to complete your online registration in one session and do not provide credit card payment, you will receive an email notification with a link for you to complete your registration.

By registering for the 2023 Building Enclosure Symposium, you consent to the following age limit policy: All registrants, including guests, must be at least 16 years of age. This policy applies to educational sessions, the exhibit hall, and networking/social events.

Credit Information:

Up to 12 IIBEC Continuing Education Hours will be made available to claim.
Sessions will be submitted to AIA.

Purchase The Recordings When You Register

For only $75.00 member/$105.00 nonmember, enjoy the entire BES 2023 experience again at your own pace throughout the year. The BES Recordings Package will allow you to gain the knowledge you need from leaders and experts within the building enclosure industry.
*IIBEC CEH or AIA Credit is not offered for this education package.

Cancellation Policy

Refund requests received 14 calendar days prior to the event will be accepted and issued a 50% refund. No refund will be processed on requests received less than 14 calendar days prior to the event. Refund requests will be processed no later than 30 days post event.

Substitution Policy

Substitution of a registered attendee is allowed at any time with the written authorization of the person who is no longer able to attend. The substitute attendee must be from the same institution as the original registered attendee. Send the name of the original registrant and substitute attendee’s name and contact information to the IIBEC in writing to meetings@iibec.org. Substitutions are subject to a $25.00 administrative fee.

*Subject to change

 

Thursday, September 28

5:30 p.m.6:30 p.m.: Evening Reception

Sponsored by SOCOTEC

Friday, September 29

7:00 a.m.6:30 p.m.

Additional session information for Friday can be found here.

7:00 a.m.—8:00 a.m.: Breakfast with Exhibitors

Sponsored by Carlisle Construction Materials

8:15 a.m.—8:45 a.m.: Welcome and Introductions

8:45 a.m.—10:15 a.m.: Building the Future: Harnessing the Power of AI in the Building Enclosure Industry
Session Classification BET
Knowledge Level Beginner
Credits This session has been approved for 1.5 IIBEC CEHs.

This course has been approved for 1.5 LU

Speaker

Trent Cotney
Adams and Reese LLP
Tampa, Florida

Moderator

Brian Pallasch, CAE
IIBEC
Raleigh, North Carolina

10:15 a.m. — 10:30 a.m.: Break with Exhibitors

Sponsored by SOPREMA

10:30 a.m.—11:30 a.m.: Fenestration Replacement: Identifying Design Solutions for Existing Buildings
Session Classification BET, EW, RS
Knowledge Level Advanced
Credits This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH.

This session has been approved for 1.0 LU.


Speakers
Leonidia Garbis, PE, LEED GA
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
New York, New York

Scott Bondi, PhD, PE, LEED AP
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
New York, New York

10:30 a.m.—11:30 a.m.: Groundhog Day: Recurring Field Installation Issues Based on 6,000 Site Audits
Session Classification AB, BECxP, EW
Knowledge Level Intermediate
Credits This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH.

This session has been approved for 1.0 LU/HSW.


Speaker
Ryan Dalgleish
Chief Operating Officer
Air Barrier Association of America

11:30 a.m. — 12:00 p.m.: Break with Exhibitors

12:00 p.m.—1:00 p.m.: Evaluation of Vapor Retarder in Roof Decks by Hygrothermal Simulation 2
Session Classification AB, R, WP
Knowledge Level Advanced
Credits This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH.

This session has been approved for 1.0 LU/HSW.


Speaker
Gourish Sirdeshpande, PhD

STR Resources
Lancaster, Pennsylvania

12:00 p.m.—1:00 p.m.: Design Implications of Envelope Backstops in Energy Codes
Session Classification C&S
Knowledge Level Intermediate
Credits This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH.

This session has been approved for 1.0 LU.


Speaker
Stéphane Hoffman, PE, P. Eng.
Morrison Hershfield Corporation
Seattle, Washington

1:00 p.m. — 2:00 p.m.: Lunch with Exhibitors

2:00 p.m.—3:30 p.m.: Building Enclosure Commissioning: A Valuable Service to Owners
Session Classification BECxP
Knowledge Level Intermediate
Credits This session has been approved for 1.5 IIBEC CEHs.

This course has been approved for 1.5 LU.

Panelists/Speakers
Jason Danielson, AIA, LEED AP, QCxP
U.S. General Services Administration
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Benjamin Townsend, PE
WDP & Associates Consulting Engineers
New York, New York

Trevor Weilbach, PE
WDP & Associates Consulting Engineers
New York, New York

Moderator

Emily Lorenz, PE, F-ACI
IIBEC
Raleigh, North Carolina

3:30 p.m. — 4:00 p.m.: Break with Exhibitors

4:00 p.m.—5:00 p.m.: Reviving a Historic Landmark: Assessment and Monitoring of “Detroit’s Largest Art Object”, the Iconic Fisher Building
Session Classification BET, EW, RS
Knowledge Level Advanced
Credits This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH.

This session has been approved for 1.0 LU/HSW.


Speaker
Ziad Salameh, PhD, PE
ZS LLC Architectural Engineering
Milwaukee, Wisconsin

4:00 p.m.—5:00 p.m.: Developing and Implementing an Ethics Strategy for Professional Consulting Firms
Session Classification BPD
Knowledge Level Beginner
Credits This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH.

This session has been approved for 1.0 LU.


Speaker
Scott Hinesley, F-IIBEC, RRC, PE
REI Engineers Inc.
Charlotte, North Carolina

5:30 p.m.—6:30 p.m.: Evening Reception with Exhibitors

Sponsored by Tremco CPG

Saturday, September 30

7:00 a.m.4:15 p.m.

Additional session information for Saturday can be found here.

7:00 a.m.—8:00 a.m.: Breakfast with Exhibitors

8:00 a.m.—9:30 a.m.: Facade Inspection Ordinances – History, Techniques, and Case Studies
Session Classification C&S, EW, S
Knowledge Level Intermediate
Credits This session has been approved for 1.5 IIBEC CEH.

This course has been approved for 1.5 LU/HSW

Speakers
Kenrick Hartman, RC, RWC, REWC, RBEC, PE, LEED AP
Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc.
New York, New York

Brian O’Donnell, RA, REWC, REWO
O’Donnell Architects LLC
Rahway, New Jersey

9:30 a.m. — 9:45 a.m.: Break with Exhibitors

9:45 a.m.—10:45 a.m.: Lessons Learned from Building Enclosure Delegated Design Disasters
Session Classification EW, WP
Knowledge Level Intermediate
Credits This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH.

This session has been approved for 1.0 LU/HSW.


Speakers
Amy Peevey, PE, RRO, REWC, CDT, CEP
SOCOTEC Consulting, Inc.
Houston, Texas

Fan Feng, PE, CDT, RRO, REWO
SOCOTEC Consulting, Inc.
Houston, Texas

9:45 a.m.—10:45 a.m.: Through the Lens of Time: A Longitudinal Review of Energy Efficiency
Session Classification R, SUS
Knowledge Level Advanced
Credits This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEH.

This session has been approved for 1.0 LU.


Speakers
Vivek Sharma, PhD, LEED AP
Department of Construction Science and Management, Clemson University
Clemson, South Carolina

Dhaval Gajjar, PhD, FMP, SFP
Department of Construction Science and Management, Clemson University
Clemson, South Carolina

10:45 a.m. — 11:15 a.m.: Break with Exhibitors

11:15 a.m.—12:15 p.m.: Changes to the Wind Load Provisions and How to Implement Strategies in a Re-Roofing Project Design
Session Classification R, W
Knowledge Level Intermediate
Credits This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEHs.

This session has been approved for 1.0 LU/HSW.


Speakers
Tarcisio Noguera, PE, LEED AP
Walter P Moore
Miami, Florida

Noah Doukas, E.I; LEED Green Associate
Walter P Moore
Orlando, Florida

11:15 a.m.—12:15 p.m.: Mind the Gap: Waterproofing Considerations in Property Line Construction
Session Classification EW, WP
Knowledge Level Intermediate
Credits This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEHs.

This session has been approved for 1.0 LU/HSW.


Speakers
Jesse Sipes, PE
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
Oakland, California

Caitlyn Kallus, PE
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
San Francisco, California

12:15 p.m. — 1:15 p.m.: Lunch with Exhibitors

1:15 p.m.—2:45 p.m.: Making Fenestration Part of Your Overall Energy Management Plan
Session Classification BET, C&S
Knowledge Level Beginner
Credits This session has been approved for 1.5 IIBEC CEHs.

This course has been approved for 1.5 LU/HSW.


Speakers
Kevin S. Louder
Senior Manager, Commercial Fenestration Programs
National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC)
Greenbelt, Maryland

Anthony Cinnamon, NCARB
Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates Inc.
Chicago, Illinois

2:45 p.m. — 3:15 p.m.: Break with Exhibitors

3:15 p.m.—4:15 p.m.: Adhered Masonry Seismic Testing
Session Classification BET, C&S, EW
Knowledge Level Intermediate
Credits This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEHs.

This session has been approved for 1.0 LU/HSW.


Speaker
Sean Scott, Arch, AIA, LEED AP
Ankrom Moisan Architects
Portland, Oregon

3:15 p.m.—4:15 p.m.: Implementing Deep Energy Retrofits is a Circus: Be the Ringmaster!
Session Classification EW, R, SUS
Knowledge Level Intermediate
Credits This session has been approved for 1.0 IIBEC CEHs.

This course has been approved for 1.0 LU/HSW.


Speakers
Jennifer S. Hogan, REWC, RRO, CRE, LEED AP, Certified Passive House Consultant
Pretium Engineering Inc.
Burlington, Ontario

Stephanie Robinson, P.Eng.
WSP Canada Inc.
Ottawa, Ontario

Friday, September 29

Presentation Classification Codes:

  • Air Barriers: AB
  • Building Commissioning: BECxP
  • Building Enclosure: BE
  • Building Enclosure Technology: BET
  • Business/Professional Development: BPD
  • Codes & Standards: C&S
  • Exterior Wall: EW
  • Leak Detection: LD
  • Restoration: RS
  • Roofing: R
  • Waterproofing: WP
  • Wind: W
  • Safety: S
  • Sustainability: SUS

8:15 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.: Welcome and Introductions

8:45 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.: Building the Future: Harnessing the Power of AI in the Building Enclosure Industry

Session Classification: BET
Knowledge Level: Beginner
Recommended Prerequisites: None

Artificial intelligence (AI) continues to be a topic of much conversation and debate and questions. How will AI impact the design and construction sector? What mundane tasks can we use AI for to increase productivity. Can AI assist in the ongoing labor shortage? What are the ethical concerns regarding the use of AI in design and construction?

According to the World Economic Forum, by the year 2025 automation and a new division of labor between humans and machines will disrupt 85 million jobs globally in medium and large businesses across 15 industries and 26 economies. This session will explore the impacts of AI in the building enclosure industry. Opportunities to use AI to increase efficiency, streamline processes, and support productivity goals will be discussed. The panelists will examine ethical and legal considerations, including intellectual property and plagiarism, that professionals encounter when implementing AI into the workplace. Expert panelists will discuss the influence of AI on project cost, resiliency, and sustainability. Attendees will have an opportunity to engage in a time of Q&A with panelists.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Assess the role of ethics in the use of AI within the building enclosure industry.
  2. Review legal implications of AI and its use within the building enclosure industry.
  3. Discuss the impact of AI on the construction and building enclosure workforce.
  4. Analyze potential uses for artificial intelligence in design and construction, including the role of AI in resiliency and sustainability within the building enclosure industry.
  5. Develop a plan for implementing the use of artificial intelligence in professional practice.

Trent Cotney
Adams and Reese LLP
Tampa, Florida

Trent Cotney, partner and construction team leader at Adams and Reese LLP, is a Florida board certified construction lawyer who is also licensed in eight other states. He focuses on construction litigation and arbitration, including OSHA defense, lien law, bond law, and bid protests, as well as construction document review and drafting. Cotney serves as general counsel for the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) and several other industry associations, and he has been recognized as one of the leading attorneys in the field by his peers and the construction industry. Cotney, author of two Amazon best-selling books on OSHA defense, also hosts the #1 construction law podcast, Law & Mortar.

Brian T. Pallasch, CAE
Executive Vice President and CEO, IIBEC
Raleigh, NC

Brian Pallasch joined the International Institute of Building Enclosure Consultants (IIBEC) as the CEO/EVP in June 2019. Responsible for the day-to-day management of the Institute, Pallasch leads a staff of 20 headquartered in Raleigh, NC, focused on serving the needs of the building enclosure profession. Pallasch also serves as a director on the board of the RCI-IIBEC Foundation.

Prior to joining IIBEC, Pallasch served as managing director of government relations and infrastructure initiatives at the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) in Washington, D.C. He was responsible for managing ASCE’s government relations department and was responsible for ASCE’s strategic initiative regarding infrastructure, including development of the Infrastructure Report Card. Previously, Pallasch was director of government relations for the American Subcontractors Association (ASA), Alexandria, Va., for three years, where he was responsible for all federal and state relations.

Currently, Pallasch serves as the Chair of the Consultative Council at the National Institute of Building Sciences. He served as president of the American League of Lobbyists in 2007-2008, after holding a seat on the board of directors from 2004-2006.

Pallasch holds a Master of Arts degree in international affairs from the American University, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in journalism and international affairs from the University of Southern California.

10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.: Fenestration Replacement: Identifying Design Solutions for Existing Buildings

Session Classification: BET, EW, RS
Knowledge Level: Advanced
Recommended Prerequisites: An understanding of enclosure systems such as windows, curtainwalls, window walls, and brick masonry.

Owners of existing buildings may often need to revitalize their building enclosures to improve performance, particularly to address air and water leaks at fenestrations. Although there are always challenges when designing within the constraints of an existing building, identifying these obstacles and anticipating difficult construction conditions during the design phase can reduce delays and problem areas in construction.  A review of several fenestration replacement case studies  and a discussion of their distinctive conditions and the proposed solutions developed by the design team will take place. In particular, best practices for detailing watertight enclosures, including how to maintain continuity at interfaces between adjacent enclosure assemblies, will be provided.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Recognize building enclosure design best practices for detailing watertight enclosures, specifically regarding air and water leakage.
  2. Discuss when and how to use nondestructive testing procedures, such as air leakage and water penetration testing, to provide critical information for the overall design, including the need for window replacement.
  3. Develop an investigative opening plan to gather pertinent information, resulting in better preparation for varying existing perimeter conditions encountered during construction.
  4. Identify potential challenges that may arise during construction and design strategic solutions in advance to mitigate those challenges.

Leonidia Garbis, PE, LEED GA

Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
New York, New York

Leonidia Garbis, PE, LEED GA, graduated with a dualdegree in architecture building technology and civil engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She specializes in designing and evaluating new and existing building enclosures. She has extensive experience designing and detailing custom curtainwall assemblies from design through construction administration. Her design experience includes commercial projects, multifamily residential high-rises, and infrastructure projects. In addition, she has experience in enclosure forensic engineering, including investigating curtainwalls and custom glazing systems. She has a background in building science, including computer simulations of buildings, and building components. She has experience with a variety of facade, roofing, and waterproofing systems.

Scott Bondi, PhD, PE, LEED AP

Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
New York, New York

Scott Bondi, PhD, PE, LEED AP, has extensive experience in building enclosure design, specializing in building science, and numerical analysis. Bondi consults on both new construction and historic renovation projects, from conceptual design through construction administration, applying his specific expertise in curtainwalls and custom glazing systems. He is experienced in providing forensic engineering services and expert witness support for both building enclosures and mechanical systems. He uses a variety of advanced tools, including computational fluid dynamics and finite element analysis, to support his design and investigative work. He has been an adjunct professor at the Cooper Union in New York City since 2007.

10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.: Groundhog Day: Recurring Field Installation Issues Based on 6,000 Site Audits

Session Classification: AB, BECxP, EW
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Basics of air barrier technologies, experience doing site observation.

Everyone knows that air barriers are important, what they do, and how they need to be installed. But how do we ensure the best chance of success for air barriers? This presentation will discuss the role and importance of the quality assurance audit. A discussion will identify what to look for while on-site, how to recognize the root cause of failure for the five key air barrier technologies, and how to develop a corrective action plan for the construction team.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss how site quality assurance audits, field observations, and site quality control fit into an overall quality assurance and risk management strategy.
  2. Determine the responsibilities of all building enclosure stakeholders to coordinate and execute a plan for quality installation.
  3. Identify by visual inspection typical anomalies found in the installation process and what caused them for a variety of air barrier systems.
  4. Demonstrate through the use of photos physical testing that can be done on a variety of air barrier systems.

Ryan Dalgleish
Chief Operating Officer
Air Barrier Association of America

Ryan Dalgleish has been involved in the building enclosure and building performance areas of construction for over 20 years. An educator and developer of building enclosure education and credentialing programs for building sub-trades, he is also a part of the quality assurance management team for field air barrier installation across North America, a certified Net Zero building instructor, and a frequent speaker at various technical events and conferences. He has obtained credentials in adult education and leadership from the University of Manitoba and has been mentored and trained by some of the best building scientists in the world.

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.: Evaluation of Vapor Retarder in Roof Decks by Hygrothermal Simulation

Session Classification: AB, R, WP
Knowledge Level: Advanced
Recommended Prerequisites: Prior knowledge of psychometry, transient heat & moisture transport, vapor drive, roof deck construction.

This presentation will provide a review of the investigation on the role of a vapor retarder in a roof assembly by hygrothermal modeling in Climate Zones 2, 7, and 8 using WUFI, an established simulation tool. For this simulation, a wood-cement composite roof deck (R-value of > 35 hr. ft2°F/BTU), utilized at various locations in the assembly, is modeled. The models, with and without a vapor retarder, provide acoustics, thermal insulation, and a nailable surface (such as oriented-stranded board). The simulation results surprisingly indicate that in climate zones up to 7, there is no risk of condensation in the roof deck without a vapor retarder.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the current steady-state methodology for determining the use of vapor retarders in roof assemblies.
  2. Describe the importance of various indoor and outdoor factors that determine the risk of condensation in roofs.
  3. Define a self-drying roof assembly and explain the conditions for a roof to be considered self-drying.
  4. Explain why the role of a vapor retarder in roof decks can be misunderstood.
  5. Discuss the need for acoustics in learning environments and the role of roof decks in achieving minimum reverberation time.

Gourish Sirdeshpande, PhD

STR Resources
Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Gourish Sirdeshpande, PhD, is a senior principal scientist at STR Resources in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Previously, he was a senior principal scientist in research and development at Armstrong World Industries Inc., with over 35 years of experience. His interests are in heat and mass transfer modeling, composite materials, building energy and indoor environment quality. He is the vice-chair of ASTM D22-05 on Indoor Air Quality and a member of the US delegation for ISO TC146-SC6 on Indoor Air Quality. He is a member of ASHRAE, ISIAQ, ASTM, and AIChE. He is also a member of ASTM-D08.

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.: Design Implications of Enclosure Backstops in Energy Codes

Session Classification: C&S
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: An understanding of energy codes and awareness of thermal bridging.

Codes are placing  increased focus on the performance of the building enclosure. One increasingly popular concept is the introduction of backstops to limit the approach of compensating a shortfall in the thermal performance of enclosures using efficiencies from other systems.  A contrast of the backstops adopted in United States and Canadian jurisdictions will take place The challenge for high-rise buildings using the case study from one of Canada’s tallest Passive House buildings will be outlined during this presentation. Examples from the Building Envelope Thermal Bridging Guide (Morrison Hershfield, Evoke, and Open Technologies 2023) will illustrate the thermal limitations of traditional spandrel design and will conclude with examples of how manufacturers are adapting to meet this challenge.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Assess the design implications for the design of enclosure backstops in US and Canadian energy codes.
  2. Discuss the special challenges enclosure backstops pose for high-rise buildings, especially for the spandrel assemblies in unitized glazing systems.
  3. Review the Building Enclosure Thermal Bridging Guide and the effective performance of spandrel assemblies commonly used in current unitized glazing system design.
  4. Explore recent developments to improve the thermal performance of spandrel assemblies.
  5. Interpret how the increasing focus on accounting for thermal bridging can be reconciled with the concept of envelope backstops.

Stéphane Hoffman, PE, P. Eng.
Morrison Hershfield Corp.
Seattle, Washington

Stéphane Hoffman, PE, P. Eng., has a master’s degree-level education that combines structural engineering, building science, and architecture. Hoffman brings a well-balanced consulting approach to the building envelope, blending scientific analysis with an understanding of aesthetic considerations.  He is particularly adept at providing innovative design concepts and construction alternatives that provide value by improving durability and increasing energy efficiency.  As a key technical leader at Morrison Hershfield, Stéphane has worked on projects throughout North America. He led the expansion of Morrison Hershfield’s building science business across the United States and pioneered its facade engineering practice focusing on the conceptual design of cladding and glazing systems.

2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.: Building Enclosure Commissioning: A Valuable Service to Owners

Session Classification: BECxP
Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Building enclosure consultants possess various skills related to the design, analysis, and investigation of building enclosure components and systems. These skills make consultants ideal candidates to act as the building enclosure commissioning provider (BECxP) and serve a role in the greater project team. Participants will learn about how they may play a role in the BECx process. The panel of industry leaders and owners will cover the value that the BECx process can provide to building owners, including the scalability of the process from small to complicated projects. Finally, panelists will discuss emerging trends associated with BECx.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Recognize the various tasks that may be conducted as part of building enclosure commissioning.
  2. Explain the role of the consultant in the building enclosure commissioning process.
  3. Discuss how building enclosure commissioning may be scaled based on project size.
  4. Identify and discuss the value of building enclosure commissioning to owners.

Panelist/Speaker

Jason Danielson, AIA, LEED AP, QCxP
U.S. General Services Administration
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Jason Danielson AIA, LEED AP, QCxP, is the General Services Administration (GSA) National Advisor for Building Enclosures, manages GSA building enclosure policy for a portfolio of 8300 owned or leased buildings and approximately 480 historic buildings.   He has served roles as award-winning architect, construction manager and enclosure consultant, BECx provider, and owner.  He has been an adjunct professor at Thomas Jefferson University and ten-year instructor for the Architectural Registration Exam. He holds a BArch from North Dakota State University and MArch from the University of Pennsylvania.  He is a Fellow of the Partnership for Public Service and a board member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Building Performance Knowledge Community.

Panelist/Speaker

Benjamin Townsend, PE
WDP & Associates Consulting Engineers
New York, New York

Ben Townsend, PE, is a senior engineer with WDP & Associates Consulting Engineers, managing the New York division. He specializes in the improvement of new and existing building envelopes and structures through forensic investigation, building enclosure commissioning (BECx), design review, construction observation, field performance verification testing, and design of repairs for failed enclosures and structural systems. He is currently a technical lead for the task group developing IIBEC’s BECxP training course. He is a member of ASTM Committee E06 on Performance of Buildings, collaborating with the work groups preparing standards on topics such as enclosure field mockups and building enclosure commissioning.

Panelist/Speaker

Trevor Weilbach, PE
WDP & Associates Consulting Engineers
New York, New York

Trevor Weilbach, PE, is a forensic engineer specializing in the building enclosure. As a senior engineer at WDP & Associates Consulting Engineers, he performs failure investigations related to the building enclosure; develops repair documents stemming from those investigations; performs diagnostic and new construction field testing; consults on new construction and renovation projects with various parties; and provides building enclosure commissioning services for new construction. He works to implement the knowledge gained through investigating failures into solutions for new construction projects to benefit all project stakeholders. He is currently a technical lead for the task group developing IIBEC’s BECxP training course.

Moderator

Emily Lorenz

Emily Lorenz, PE, F-ACI
IIBEC
Raleigh, North Carolina

Emily Lorenz, PE, F-ACI, specializes in building code and standards work and advocacy, currently representing the International Institute of Building Enclosure Consultants as its senior director of technical services. Lorenz actively participates as vice chair of the Envelope Subcommittee developing the commercial provisions of the 2024 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and as a voting member of several committees including the 2024 IECC Commercial Committee, the Envelope Subcommittee of ASHRAE 90.1, the ASTM International Committee E60 on Sustainability, and the American Concrete Institute’s building code subcommittee on sustainability. She also serves as an expert to ISO TC59\SC17\WG3 Environmental Declarations of Products.

4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.: Reviving a Historic Landmark: Assessment and Monitoring of “Detroit’s Largest Art Object”, the Iconic Fisher Building

Session Classification: BET, EW, RS
Knowledge Level: Advanced
Recommended Prerequisites: An understanding of historic exterior walls performance and project monitoring techniques.

The restoration of the Fisher Building, a national historic landmark, and considered a unique and exemplary piece of Art Deco architecture as well as an iconic beacon for the city of Detroit, Michigan, may appear to many to be a daunting task. Utilizing a combination of state-of-the-art 3D Laser Scanning (LiDAR) combined with traditional hands-on examination techniques, a multipronged approach was developed to understand the unique challenges facing the Fisher Building. This presentation will provide the learners with an overview of the lessons learned and will discuss the development and implementation of the restoration plan.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Detail how a large-scale hands-on facade inspection was performed with a summary of the lessons learned.
  2. Describe remediation techniques and the unique challenges encountered during the stabilization of this iconic marble-clad facade.
  3. Discuss the capabilities and limitations of LiDAR when utilized to remotely monitor a building facade.
  4. Examine the process of working within the standards for historic restoration.

Ziad Salameh, PhD, PE
ZS LLC Architectural Engineering
Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Ziad Salameh, PhD, PE, principal-in-charge at ZS LLC (ZS), a multidisciplinary consulting engineering firm, brings more than 30 years of professional experience in the engineering and construction industry. Salameh is active in structural designs, structural failure investigations, building enclosure assessments, historic restoration, and laser scanning to building information modeling (BIM) technology. For the Fisher project, Salameh acted as the project executive and was responsible for the multiple assignments that ZS LLC was assigned for the project.

4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.: Developing and Implementing an Ethics Strategy for Professional Consulting Firms

Session Classification: BPD
Knowledge Level: Beginner

Ethics often is only addressed reactively within companies, either after a problem has occurred or in an ad hoc way. Reactionary ethics is often costly, resulting in potential loss of business and/or reputation as well as penalties and fines. Alternately, action is required within organizations striving to ensure a sound ethical culture. This action requires dedication and hard work to ensure the ethical policy is formulated wisely, instituted appropriately, and maintained throughout the life cycle of the business. This session will present examples of ethical policies that have added to a positive company culture and have contributed greatly to many companies’ success stories.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss ethical issues for a professional consulting business including a code of conduct.
  2. Develop guidelines for an organizational culture of ethical awareness including visible policies and ethical workplace standards.
  3. Provide a framework for establishing and communicating the company’s ethical goals, status, and standing.
  4. Define best practices for creating an enduring ethical culture that becomes an integral part of the company’s operations.

Scott Hinesley, F-IIBEC, RRC, PE
REI Engineers Inc.
Charlotte, North Carolina

Hinesley is the president of REI Engineers Inc. (REI), a building enclosure consulting firm with eight locations serving the eastern United States. Scott received his degree in civil engineering from North Carolina State University and worked for a multi services engineering firm in Raleigh, North Carolina, for several years before joining REI in 1998.

For over 20 years, he has been an active member of IIBEC and the American Council of Engineering Companies North Carolina Chapter (ACEC/NC). He recently completed his term as president for both organizations. He has served as president of the Carolinas Chapter of IIBEC and served on the Ethics Committee, the Technical Advisory Committee, and the IIBEC Interface Peer Review Committee.

Hinesley is a Registered Roof Consultant (RRC), a licensed professional engineer, a member of the IIBEC Jury of Fellows and serves on the Board of Directors for the RCI-IIBEC Foundation. He resides in Charlotte, North Carolina, with his wife and two sons.

Saturday, September 30

Presentation Classification Codes:

  • Air Barriers: AB
  • Building Commissioning: BECxP
  • Building Enclosure: BE
  • Building Enclosure Technology: BET
  • Business/Professional Development: BPD
  • Codes & Standards: C&S
  • Exterior Wall: EW
  • Leak Detection: LD
  • Restoration: RS
  • Roofing: R
  • Waterproofing: WP
  • Wind: W
  • Safety: S
  • Sustainability: SUS

8:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.: Facade Inspection Ordinances – History, Techniques, and Case Studies

Session Classification: C&S, EW, S
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Baseline understanding of different wall construction types and materials.

Several tragic events related to facade failures occurred in the 1970s. As a result, some major cities in the United States adopted laws and ordinances requiring certain buildings to undergo periodic facade inspections. Currently, cities with active facade inspection ordinances generally require a qualified individual to review a building’s facade. Individuals qualified to conduct these facade inspections must be able to identify conditions that pose a risk to public safety as well as ensure those identified deficiencies are repaired in a specified timeframe.
This presentation will provide a brief history of the United States facade inspection ordinances. Speakers will discuss New York City’s Facade Inspection & Safety Program, which is one of the country’s more rigorous. Commonly encountered deficiencies specific to various wall construction types will be identified. Case studies presented will outline the practical application of these requirements as well as professional considerations during their implementation.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss facade inspection laws, condition ratings, and inspection procedures.
  2. Identify commonly encountered conditions related to various exterior wall and building construction types.
  3. Recognize codes, standards, and facade inspection techniques.
  4. Explain New York City’s administrative facade inspection requirements.

Kenrick Hartman, RC, RWC, REWC, RBEC, PE, LEED AP
Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc.
New York, New York

Kenrick Hartman, RC, RWC, REWC, RBEC, PE, LEED AP, specializes in the evaluation, repair, and design of building enclosure systems. He has extensive experience in managing all phases of the investigation, repair design, and construction periods, applying his expertise when consulting on new construction projects. Mr. Hartman is knowledgeable in various materials, including terra cotta, brick, glass fiber reinforced concrete, steel, concrete glass, and various roofing and waterproofing products.

Mr. Hartman has been awarded the IIBEC Emerging Professionals Award of Excellence, the Francesco Volunteer of the Year Award, and the Outstanding Volunteer Award. In addition, he was awarded the J. Borda Fellowship, the CER Fellowship, and a research assistantship, by Pennsylvania State University. He has authored many industry-related publications, including Evaluating As-Built Properties of Masonry Wall Systems Using Investigative Laboratory and In-Situ Testing for IIBEC, Floodproofing New York: The City’s Response to Superstorm Sandy for IIBEC, and Considerations for Blindside Waterproofing Applications for the Architectural Engineering Institute.

Brian O’Donnell, RA, REWC, REWO
O’Donnell Architects LLC
Rahway, New Jersey

Brian O’Donnell, RA, REWC, REWO is a principal at O’Donnell Architects LLC an architectural firm specializing in building envelope design, diagnostics, and repairs. He has inspected hundreds of building facades and is a registered architect in a number of states as well as a Registered Exterior Wall Consultant (REWC) and Registered Exterior Wall Observer (REWO). Mr. O’Donnell is a member of IIBEC, NCARB, NRCA, CSI, and ASTM International, where he is an active member of Committees E06 Performance of Buildings, and D08 Roofing and Waterproofing. He has previously served as treasurer of the IIBEC Delaware Valley Chapter, a member of the IIBEC Ethics Committee, and a member of both the REWO and REWC Exam Development Subcommittees.

9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.: Lessons Learned from Building Enclosure Delegated Design Disasters

Session Classification: EW, WP
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Knowledge and experience designing and/or constructing various building enclosure waterproofing assemblies, including opaque exterior walls and unique expansion joint layouts.

Many modern enclosures include delegated designs of building components by specialty engineers who are not a part of the design team and where the final system designs are not fully developed until after construction is underway. While delegated design can seemingly mitigate risk for the design team by allowing third-party specialized engineered systems, the entire project can be impacted if the delegated design is not properly defined, executed, integrated, and coordinated. This presentation will focus on the problems resulting from building enclosure-delegated designs and provide tools for owners, contractors, and design professionals to mitigate problems, avoiding unnecessary risks.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Review the types of delegated design systems and related performance requirements.
  2. Analyze the limitations of a delegated designer’s responsibility and the associated risks.
  3. Discuss the lessons learned resulting from delegated design deficiencies and impact field deviations.
  4. Assess the project scope and design provisions that help mitigate potential delegated design issues.

Amy Peevey, PE, RRO, REWC, CDT, CEP
SOCOTEC Consulting Inc.
Houston, Texas

Amy Peevey, PE, RRO, REWC, CDT, CEP, is a building enclosure engineer with over 20 years of experience in new design, investigation, evaluation, restoration, project advisory, and dispute resolution services for building enclosure systems and related structural components. She received her bachelor of science from the University of Texas at Austin and is a registered professional engineer. Peevey is a seasoned presenter and published member of several technical trade associations and an active contributor to the building enclosure community. She currently serves as IIBEC board president.

Fan Feng, PE, CDT, RRO, REWO
SOCOTEC Consulting Inc.

Houston, Texas

Fan Feng, PE, CDT, RRO, REWO, is a building enclosure expert specializing in design, construction, and forensics restoration. As an associate with SOCOTEC in Houston, Texas, she leads project consulting with her technical knowledge and eight years of experience.

She is dedicated to solving clients’ building enclosure-related problems with her expertise. She has extensive building enclosure consulting experience via a wide range of projects for both existing buildings and new construction in design peer review, condition assessment, investigation, evaluation, repair design, thermal simulation and analysis, construction administration, and testing. In addition, she specializes in various building enclosure systems for below-grade waterproofing, deck and plaza waterproofing, exterior wall cladding, fenestrations, and low-sloped roofing systems.

9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.: Through the Lens of Time: A Longitudinal Review of Energy Efficiency

Session Classification: R, SUS
Knowledge Level: Advanced
Recommended Prerequisites: An understanding of energy efficiency related to building enclosure systems.

The primary intent of this presentation is to guide the audience through the journey of attempting to answer the following questions: Do we understand the term sustainability? Can we genuinely assess the relationship between the built environment and sustainability?

The objective of the systematic literature review conducted for 280 studies was to understand the

impact of the built environment on energy savings, especially the efficiency of roofing systems and their overarching impact on energy efficiency. The discussion will include the effects of roof membrane on energy savings of the roof/building enclosure, including the following key points:

  • Increasing reflectance and albedo value of roofing membrane directly impact the roof’s energyefficiency,resultinginanincreaseinenergy
  • The role of key parameters (months in the year, insulation, climate zones, etc.) on energy efficiency and its consideration in the various studies.
  • Path forward for the roofing industry to direct and design studies on energy efficiency that benefit the industry, buildings, and the environment.

This presentation will offer a thorough examination of the roofing sector by combining the results of several past investigations on energy efficiency and the path forward.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Assess the impact of increasing reflectance and albedo value of roofing membranes on energy efficiency and energy savings.
  2. Assess energy efficiency impacts in differing regions and how roof assembly design impacts design decision-making in various climatic regions.
  3. Recognize the role of investigation on life-cycle analysis and how the roof design impacts the calculations of energy savings in dollar value.
  4. Apply the study’s findings in the decision-making for the design of the building enclosure to achieve long-term sustainability goals.

Vivek Sharma, PhD, LEED AP
Department of Construction Science and Management, Clemson University

Clemson, South Carolina

Vivek Sharma, PhD, LEED AP, focuses on capital project performance and life-cycle assessment, project data analytics, machine learning and AI-tech integration, workforce, and knowledge management. He helped develop and implement an external Healthcare Benchmarking Program for the Construction Industry Institute (CII) funded by the US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) and the US Department of Defense (DoD)/Military Health System (MHS) and a physical infrastructure (PI) for federal facilities data analytics research and application project. He chairs the Deployment (Healthcare Benchmarking and Professional Development) subcommittee under the Facilities and Healthcare Sector Committee for the CII, University of Texas, Austin.

 

Dhaval Gajjar, PhD, FMP, SFP
Department of Construction Science and Management, Clemson University
Clemson, South Carolina

Dhaval Gajjar, PhD, FMP, SFP, is an assistant professor at Clemson University’s Department of Construction Science and Management in the College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities. He has researched construction workforce and talent attraction strategies, project delivery, project closeout, and post-occupancy evaluation. He is a certified Facility Management Professional and Sustainable Facility Professional. He has significant industry experience working as a project manager for a commercial general contractor and as a construction owner rep for large capital projects.

11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.: Changes to the Wind Load Provisions and How to Implement Strategies in a Re-Roofing Project Design

Session Classification: R, W
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Understand wind load effects on bindings and be familiar with ASCE 7-16 wind provisions.

ASCE 7-16 contains significant changes from ASCE 7-10 in the areas of seismic design, wind design, and snow design, along with a new chapter on design against tsunami loads. Several of the seismic chapters have been extensively rewritten. As ASCE 7 eventually becomes law through adoption by the International Building Code (IBC) and then through legal building codes of local jurisdiction adopting IBC’s standards, a practicing engineer must be diligent to keep up with these changes. On the East coast of the United States, wind design controls most of the roofing design of a building, as well as strict design parameters.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the process of performing an assessment of an existing roof system.
  2. Review the changes and wind-resistance requirements from ASCE 7-10 to ASCE 7-16
  3. Assess the design parameters in accordance with the new ASCE 7-16 code guidelines.
  4. Review a case study for a step-by-step wind design analysis for a building located in a high velocity wind zone

Tarcisio Noguera, PE, LEED AP
Walter P Moore
Miami, Florida

Tarcisio Noguera, PE, LEED AP, WMI, THLV2, is an engineer and senior project manager for Walter P. Moore Diagnostics. He has more than 15 years of domestic and international experience in the field of building enclosures and forensic engineering. His expertise includes assessing and designing repairs for distress related to moisture management, roofing systems, and below-grade waterproofing on concrete substrates. He has participated in the roof design and construction administration for international projects such as Corrasco International Airport, and five 2014 FIFA  World Cup stadiums in Brazil.

 

Noah Doukas, EI; LEED Green Associate
Walter P Moore
Orlando, Florida

Noah Doukas, engineer intern (EI), LEED Green Associate, is a graduate engineer in Walter P Moore’s Orlando Diagnostics Group with experience in structural engineering, building enclosure consulting, and forensic consulting. His expertise includes evaluating, assessing, and designing repairs for structural systems and building envelope components. He develops work scopes, repair details, repair procedures, and technical specifications for concrete and steel restoration, waterproofing, and stucco rehabilitation projects. He has been involved in many large and complex projects across the Southeastern United States.

11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.: Mind the Gap: Waterproofing Considerations in Property Line Construction

Session Classification: EW, WP
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Knowledge and experience designing or constructing various building enclosure waterproofing assemblies, including opaque exterior walls, and unique expansion joint assemblies.

For urban infill construction projects, designers and contractors are challenged with forming the exterior enclosure mere inches from neighboring buildings. All components of the exterior enclosure require special consideration, including below-grade waterproofing product selection and implementation, exterior wall construction methods, and weather-resistive barrier application with limited access. Critical elements include air and water barrier continuity, expansion and contraction tolerances, futureproofing for long-term durability during neighboring construction, seismic movement requirements, and watertight joint coverings. This presentation will explore the challenges, potential pitfalls, and successes of designing and installing a watertight exterior enclosure in new high-rise construction with property line constraints.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Present a variety of approaches to interacting with existing neighboring construction with limited access.
  • Review below-grade waterproofing considerations and installations that abut existing neighboring buildings.
  • Explore alternate exterior wall types: concrete/concrete masonry unit, framed tilt-up wall, or shaft wall assemblies.
  • Review exterior enclosure detailing considerations to maintain continuity of the air and water barrier between walls and adjacent finishes.

Jesse Sipes, PE
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
Oakland, California

 

Jesse Sipes, PE, is a senior consulting engineer at Simpson Gumpertz & Heger with more than seven years of building enclosure consulting experience in the San Francisco Bay Area. He has experience with investigation, consultation, litigation, and inspection work on new and existing multi-unit and single-family residential, commercial, and institutional projects. His design and investigation work includes below-grade waterproofing, plaza deck coatings, wall cladding assemblies, and roofing systems.

 

Caitlyn Kallus, PE
Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
San Francisco, California

 

Caitlyn Kallus, PE, is a consultant at Simpson Gumpertz & Heger with over six years of experience in commercial building enclosure consulting work in the San Francisco Bay and Los Angeles areas, including new design consultation, rehabilitation, investigations, inspections, and condition assessments. Her project experience spans various systems, including below-grade waterproofing, plaza deck waterproofing, exterior cladding systems, exterior curtainwalls, window assemblies, and roofing systems.

1:15 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.: General Session: Making Fenestration Part of Your Overall Energy Management Plan

Session Classification: BET, C&S
Knowledge Level: Beginner

While we see windows and doors every day, we may not fully appreciate the importance of these critical building components. Without proper design and planning, fenestration can significantly impact energy consumption and the occupants’ experience. Occupancy comfort can be negatively impacted due to drafts or excessive room heating from solar gains. Aesthetic and functional issues, such as condensation, frost formation, or water staining on interior surfaces during the winter, can also arise . This session will outline the importance of energy-efficient fenestration in commercial buildings, opportunities for new construction and full fenestration retrofits, and steps to make fenestration part of an overall energy efficiency plan that meets code requirements.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss the role of product certification in fenestration and its effects on building energy consumption and comfort.
  2. Identify key factors when selecting or replacing fenestration including window-to-wall ratio, certified product performance ratings, and climate zone.
  3. Assess various emerging glazing technologies that claim to reduce building energy use.
  4. Detail potential energy savings and increased occupancy comfort that can be achieved through the adoption of energy-efficient commercial fenestration.

Kevin S. Louder
Senior Manager, Commercial Fenestration Programs
National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC)
Greenbelt, Maryland

Kevin Louder has been in the fenestration industry since 2000 and is currently employed by the National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) as the senior manager, Commercial Fenestration Programs with a primary focus on the commercial fenestration rating programs. He holds a bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering and received an engineering-in-training certificate in Pennsylvania. He has been instrumental in developing a new rating procedure for commercial products using a trendline methodology. This refined process allows for every building to have the opportunity to showcase its efficiency and lead us into a future through continuous improvement in fenestration.

His primary area of study and work has been focused on thermal and heat transfer. His career started at one of the NFRC-accredited laboratories, performing thermal analysis on fenestration systems related to thermal performance ratings, condensation assessment, whole building facade analysis, Infrared thermography, durability through thermal cycling and climate exposure, and component evaluation using computer simulation, physical testing evaluation, and on-site field investigations. He has focused much of his early work in the commercial sector and has been instrumental in performing energy performance facade analysis on many well-known buildings.

Anthony Cinnamon, NCARB
Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates Inc.
Chicago, Illinois

Anthony Cinnamon, NCARB, is an associate principal with Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates Inc. in the Chicago, Illinois, office. His expertise lies in the design and analysis of exterior enclosures with an emphasis on glass, curtainwalls, and fenestration systems. He has written numerous articles on the inspection, repair/restoration, and replacement of window and facade systems. He has also presented seminars domestically and internationally on fenestration-related topics, including typical window problems, testing and repair of window and curtainwall systems, and typical glass failures. Cinnamon currently serves as the chair of the board of directors of the NFRC.

3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.: Adhered Masonry Seismic Testing

Session Classification: BET, C&S, EW
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: Adhered masonry system familiarity, Awareness of seismic code requirements

Adhered masonry does not currently meet the national code. Code requiring inelastic seismic testing does not exist in our industry, and it’s impossible to reliably calculate all variables. Adhered masonry cladding typically meets a standard of care, but not code. Testing of six specimens for three of the most common assembly types is concluding this year (2023). These first test results in the industry will yield applicable rules of thumb. This testing required the development of a testing process using standards, all of which should be applicable to future codes.

We appreciate the RCI-IIBEC Foundation for contributing to this research.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the current requirements of the national code in relation to adhered masonry (installed with other cladding / glazing systems) in resisting seismic events.
  2. Explain how to test and determine if adhered masonry cladding complies with the national seismic code.
  3. Discuss why the national seismic code requirements were developed and are applicable across various regions in the United States.
  4. List four challenges (with corresponding solutions) each practitioner is likely to encounter while researching, developing, and designing cladding systems to comply with the national code.
  5. State the simple rule of thumb that can be applied to any adhered masonry building to determine if the installation meets code.

Sean Scott, Arch, AIA, LEED AP
Ankrom Moisan Architects
Portland, Oregon

Sean Scott, Arch, AIA, LEED AP, has over 27 years of experience working as an enclosure-focused architect, and building scientist, University of Oregon professor, and contractor.  He has made a habit of contributing to the building industry’s field of knowledge. He is known as a process-driven, high-value member of the enclosure field in the Pacific Northwest. With his clear, concise communication style, he leads his firm of 250 through consulting, research, and education. He has served on the Portland Building Enclosure Council and is currently a technical advocate. He has worked in London, England, Ghana, West Africa, and the United States.

 

3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.: Implementing Deep Energy Retrofits is a Circus: Be the Ringmaster!

Session Classification: EW, R, SUS
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Recommended Prerequisites: A general understanding of building science principles and common building retrofits.

As net-zero targets loom, the push is on to complete deep energy retrofits. The retrofits necessary to achieve these lofty targets are typically extensive and can be very intrusive. How do we implement them at occupied buildings? These projects are like a three-ring circus, with competing interests on all sides. Through the use of case studies, this session will explore how the building enclosure consultant can become the ringmaster, balancing the needs of project stakeholders, the surprises that come with existing buildings, and the quality and durability of the building enclosure necessary to achieve the project’s energy and carbon reduction goals.

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the connection between the building enclosure and mechanical systems when completing a deep energy retrofit.
  2. Identify key considerations when planning a deep energy retrofit.
  3. List best practices for tenant communication during deep energy retrofits.
  4. Identify challenges that existing building conditions can impose on retrofit projects.

Jennifer S. Hogan, REWC, RRO, CRE, LEED AP, Certified Passive House Consultant
Pretium Engineering Inc.
Burlington, Ontario

Recipient of the IIBEC Emerging Professional Award of Excellence and OBEC’s Rising Star Award, Jennifer Hogan is passionate about building sciences, energy performance, and, of course, baseball. She has been a building science consultant for over 16 years and now uses her experience and knowledge to help clients achieve their energy and carbon goals as the leader of the Energy and Carbon Reduction team at Pretium. If you asked Jennifer what her favorite thing is about her career, she would tell you that it is being able to share her love of the built environment with others. To that end, she is a frequent speaker and presenter at industry events and has authored several technical publications. She is an active member of multiple industry associations and is currently serving on the IIBEC Executive Committee as secretary/treasurer.

Stephanie Robinson, P.Eng.
WSP Canada Inc.
Ottawa, Ontario

Stephanie Robinson, PEng, is the director of building sciences, Eastern Canada for WSP Canada Inc. Based in Ottawa, Ontario, she has over 15 years’ experience in the building enclosure industry, including investigation, design, contract administration, and construction review of building enclosure components for new and existing construction in both Canada and the United States. She recognizes that there is more than one solution to every challenge and believes that careful consideration of every option will lead to a unique strategy to both fulfill a client’s needs and optimize a building’s performance. Robinson is a licensed professional engineer in Ontario and a Level 2 Certified Thermographer. She was one of the founding members of the IIBEC Quebec Ontario Chapter and currently sits on the IIBEC Board of Directors as director of Region VII.

Rosen Shingle Creek
9939 Universal Boulevard
Orlando, FL  32819
www.rosenshinglecreek.com

Group Name:  2023 IIBEC Building Enclosure Symposium

Reservations: Book online here

866-996-6338 or 407-996-6338

Cut-Off Date:  Wednesday, September 6, 2023, 5:00 p.m. ET

$194.00 Single/Double (additional person above two, $20.00)
No charge for children under the age of 17 years of age utilizing existing bedding.

Room Tax:  12.5% 

Hotel Information

Check in:  3:00 p.m.
Check out:  11:00 a.m. 

Hotel Early Departure Fee: Guests wishing to avoid an early departure fee of $50.00 should advise the hotel at or before check-in of any change in planned length of stay.

Guest Room Internet: Complimentary Basic Internet Access

Parking: Complimentary self-parking

The Spa at Shingle Creek: A twenty percent (20%) discount on Shingle Creek Spa treatments and services (exclusive of service charge and tax). Appointments based on availability. Discount not applicable to special priced spa packages.

Rosen’s Total Commitment 

Rosen Shingle Creek Know Before You Go

Baggage Airline Guest Service (B.A.G.S.) BAGS — Transportation Security Administration-approved remote skycap service that allows guests to receive their airline boarding passes and check their luggage for departures directly from the lobby of Rosen Shingle Creek. For additional information, please contact directly at 800-996-9939. 

Ground Transportation

For taxi, shuttle and town car transportation and pricing to and from Orlando International Airport, guests may visit www.mearstransportation.com to make reservations online or phone:  407-423-5566.

Driving Directions from the Orlando International Airport

  • Take the North Exit from the airport.
  • Take the SR-528 (Beachline Expressway).
  • Take Exit #2 Orangewood Blvd./Universal Blvd.
  • At the end of the exit ramp make a right at the light onto Universal Blvd.
  • Rosen Shingle Creek is immediately on the right, just before the Rosen School of Hospitality Management – UCF.

Universal Orlando Hotel Partner, where guests enjoy complimentary scheduled daily transportation to and from Universal Orlando and SeaWorld. Reservations are required.

Hotel Payment Policy

HOTEL requires that all reservations be secured by the reservations due date with a guaranteed payment method.  Credit cards, debit cards, checks and money orders are acceptable forms of guarantee and/or deposit funds.  Five (5) days prior to your arrival, a one night’s guestroom and tax authorization will be processed on your credit/debit card, if there is no deposit.  Please be aware that an authorization on a debit card will reduce the funds available in your bank account at that time. Any guestrooms not secured by a deposit will be returned to the HOTEL’s inventory on the reservations due date (cut-off) of Wednesday, September 6, 2023.  The hotel has a five (5) day individual guest room cancellation policy.  If an individual guest cancels less than five (5) days prior to arrival, the credit/debit card used to guarantee the reservation will be charged a one night’s guestroom and tax fee.  If deposit was sent in (mailed) to guarantee the reservation it will be refunded only if the room is canceled more than five (5) days before arrival or forfeited within the cancellation policy.

Cancellation Policy

Cancellations within five (5) days of arrival are subject to one-night’s guest room and tax.

IIBEC is not responsible for no-shows or early departure fees charged by the hotel or rooms resold due to non-arrival. Your specific reservation is being held for you in the inventory of rooms the hotel blocked for this meeting. IIBEC takes no responsibility should a room type not be available at check-in.

Hotel Scam Warning

Scam housing companies are approaching IBECC attendees and exhibitors with fraudulent offerings of hotel rooms at significant discounts. Lured by highly attractive rates, exhibitors and attendees fall prey to these impostors and end up losing significant deposits, discovering hidden costs, having to pay upfront charges, or being bait and switched to hotel rooms they never booked. These “housing” companies are in no way affiliated with IIBEC or the Rosen Shingle Creek.

IIBEC or the Rosen Shingle Creek will not contact you directly to make a reservation. The only way to guarantee a room reservation is to use the hotel booking link provided to you in your registration confirmation email.

If you are contacted by anyone asking if you need a room reservation for the IIBEC 2023 Building Enclosure Symposium or claiming to represent the “IIBEC housing provider,” please get as much information as you can, then email meetings@IIBEC.org.

If you are contacted by anyone asking if you need a room reservation for the IIBEC 2022 Building Enclosure Symposium or claiming to represent the “IIBEC housing provider,” please get as much information as you can, then email meetings@IIBEC.org.

 

Rosen Shingle Creek is located less than 20 minutes from the Orlando International Airport (MCO)

1 Jeff Fuqua Blvd
Orlando, FL 32827

Baggage Airline Guest Service (B.A.G.S.) BAGS — Transportation Security Administration-approved remote skycap service that allows guests to receive their airline boarding passes and check their luggage for departures directly from the lobby of Rosen Shingle Creek. For additional information, please contact directly at 800-996-9939. 

Ground Transportation

For taxi, shuttle and town car transportation and pricing to and from Orlando International Airport, guests may visit www.mearstransportation.com to make reservations online or phone:  407-423-5566.

Driving Directions from the Orlando International Airport

  • Take the North Exit from the airport.
  • Take the SR-528 (Beachline Expressway)
  • Take Exit #2 Orangewood Blvd./Universal Blvd.
  • At the end of the exit ramp make a right at the light onto Universal Blvd.
  • Rosen Shingle Creek is immediately on the right, just before the Rosen School of Hospitality Management – UCF.

Things to Do in Orlando

A world of thrilling attractions, superb restaurants, championship golf courses, world-class performing arts, and more than 1,200 retail shops await you. Start planning your adventures before you arrive with Orlando Virtual Tour, which offers immersion into everything you’ll want to experience during your visit.

As an exhibitor at the IIBEC Building Enclosure Symposium, your products or services will be marketable to an audience of over 300 attendees. Target Audience architects, engineers, contractors, facility, managers, and other professionals who specialize in roofing, waterproofing and exterior wall tech. IIBEC is accepting exhibit space reservations and will release space based upon the order of reservations received.  Click here for this year’s Exhibitor Contract.

You must complete the exhibit application and payment by August 31, 2023, for recognition in the on-site signage.

Looking for additional opportunities at BES? Download the BES 2023 Exhibitor & Sponsorship Prospectus.

 

Tabletop Exhibit Fees

Category Members Non-member
Booth $2,250 $2,750
Additional Booth Staff $200 $200

 

Exhibit fees include:

  • (1) skirted* 30” x 8’ table
  • (2) chairs
  • (2) Full Conference Registrations

*Skirted with black linen

Electricity can be purchased directly through convention services. More details will follow.

Application Process and Deadline

All exhibit applications must be submitted using the BES 2023 Exhibitor Contract. Only completed applications accommodated by payment will be considered. The application and all required documentation must be completed and submitted to IIBEC by August 31, 2023. For IIBEC’s full Exhibitor Terms and Conditions, click here.

 

Exhibitor Cancellation Policy

The cancellation policy is as follows:

  • If Exhibitor cancels this Contract, Exhibitor may only do so by giving notice thereof in writing sent to IIBEC with evidence of receipt. If such written notice is received at least 90 days prior to the opening date of the Event, then Exhibitor will remain liable for 50% of the total exhibit fee. If notice of cancellation is received less than 90 days prior to the Event, Exhibitor will remain liable for 100% of the total exhibit fee, regardless of when this Contract is executed by Exhibitor. In addition, Exhibitor will remain liable for 100% of all fees paid or payable in respect of sponsorships and promotional products, regardless of when this Contract is executed or cancelled by Exhibitor.
  • Contact Arissa Cooper, Manager of Marketing & Sales, at acooper@iibec.org for more information. For IIBEC’s full Exhibitor Terms and Conditions, click here.

Important Exhibitor Deadlines*

Installation Thursday, September 28 1:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Exhibit Friday, September 29 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Exhibit Saturday, September 30 7:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Dismantle Saturday, September 30 3:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

*dates and times are subject to change without notice

Exhibitors must represent products and services that serve a purpose within the building enclosure industry. Exhibitors may not permit any other party to exhibit in their space, any goods other than those manufactured or distributed by the contracting exhibitor or permit the solicitation of business by others within their booth space.

Thank You to Our 2023 Exhibitors

Download a floor plan of exhibitors here.

Air Barrier Association of America
ATAS International Inc
BNP Media – Building Enclosure, Roofing Contractor, Walls and Ceilings
Building Commissioning Association
Carlisle Construction Materials
Dörken Systems Inc
Elevate
FlashCo
Georgia-Pacific
Henry, A Carlisle Company
IB Roof Systems Inc
Ideal Building Solutions Roofing
IR Analyzers / Vector Mapping
Johns Manville
KOSTER American Corporation
Leister Technologies, LLC
McElroy Metal Inc
National Gypsum Company
O’Hagin LLC
Pecora Corporation
Polyglass
RTC Waterproofing & Restoration Inc
Sika Corporation
Siplast
SOCOTEC
SOPREMA
Stone Mountain Access Systems
Tremco CPG Inc.
TRUFAST LLC
USG Securock
Valcourt Building Services
W.R. Meadows

Thank You to Our 2023 Sponsors

Thank You to Our 2023 Media Sponsors

IIBEC Events Code of Conduct

IIBEC is committed to providing a safe, productive, and welcoming environment for all meeting participants and IIBEC staff. All participants, including, but not limited to, attendees, speakers, volunteers, exhibitors, IIBEC staff members, service providers, and all others, are expected to abide by this IIBEC Events Code of Conduct. This policy applies to all IIBEC meeting-related events, including those sponsored by organizations other than IIBEC but held in conjunction with IIBEC events, on public or private platforms.

IIBEC has zero tolerance for any form of discrimination or harassment, including but not limited to sexual harassment by participants or our staff at our meetings. If you experience harassment or hear of any incidents of unacceptable behavior, we ask that you inform IIBEC’s CEO or COO so that appropriate action may be taken.

Unacceptable behavior is defined as:

  • Harassment, intimidation, or discrimination in any form.
  • Verbal or written abuse of any attendee, speaker, volunteer, exhibitor, IIBEC staff member, service provider, or other meeting guest.
  • Examples of abuse include, but are not limited to, verbal or written comments related to gender, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body, size, race, religion, national origin, inappropriate use of nudity and/or sexual images in public spaces or in presentations, or threatening or stalking any attendee, speaker, volunteer, exhibitor, IIBEC staff member, service provider, or other meeting guest.
  • Unwelcome attention or contact with another participant.
  • Express or implied threat of physical or professional harm.
  • Disruption of presentations during sessions, in the exhibit hall, or at other events organized by IIBEC throughout the virtual meeting. All participants must comply with the instructions of the moderator and any IIBEC event staff.
  • Presentations, postings, and messages should not contain promotional materials, special offers, job offers, product announcements, or solicitation for services. IIBEC reserves the right to remove such messages and potentially ban sources of those solicitations.
  • Participants should not copy or take screen shots of Q&A or any chat room activity that takes place in virtual spaces.

IIBEC reserves the right to take any action deemed necessary and appropriate in IIBEC’s sole discretion, including immediate removal from the meeting without warning or refund, in response to any incident of unacceptable behavior, and IIBEC reserves the right to prohibit attendance at any future meeting, virtually or in person.

IIBEC’s Attendee Assumption of Risk

Attendee assumes all risks and accepts sole responsibility for any injury (including, but not limited to, personal injury, disability, and death), illness, damage, loss, claim, liability, or expense, of any kind, that attendee may experience or incur in connection with attending the IIBEC Building Enclosure Symposium. Such risk may include exposure to the COVID-19 virus and any injury, illness, disability, and/or death caused by such exposure. Accordingly, attendee understands and agrees that this release includes any claims based on the actions, omissions, or negligence of IIBEC, its employees, agents, and representatives, whether a COVID-19 infection occurs before, during, or after participation in the IIBEC Building Enclosure Symposium. Attendee further hereby releases, covenants not to sue, discharges, and holds harmless IIBEC, its employees, agents, and representatives, of and from any other claims, including all liabilities, claims, actions, damages, costs, or expenses of any kind arising out of or relating thereto.

Thank You to Our 2023 Building Enclosure Symposium Committee Members.

This group serves to direct program development for the association’s annual Symposium on Building Enclosure Technology.

Jared Lawrence
Chair
Terracon
Troy, Michigan

Joesph Bukovec
Thornton Tomasetti Inc
North Haven, Connecticut

Wendy Fraser
Canadian Roofing Contractors Association
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Sandy Hembroff
Alberta Technical Construction Services Inc.
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Ryan Krug
Lerch Bates
Edens Prairie, Minnesota

Samuel LaRoche
BC Building Science Ltd.
New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada

Kristen Navaid
Walker Consultants
Hoffman Estates, Illinois

Michel Paulin
Fishburn Sheridan & Associates Ltd
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Jay Rodriguez
Market Makers Inc
Austin, Texas

Scott Toller
Corgan Architects
Roanoke, Texas

Craig Wetmore
York Manufacturing
Sanford, Maine

Jean-Loup Yale
EXP Global Inc.
Terrebonne, Quebec, Canada

The resources and references listed on this page are provided for event presenters/authors.

For questions, reach out to: education@iibec.org

General Information

Event Speaker Timeline:  This timeline outlines submission deadlines for event presenters/authors.

Guidelines for Presentation: This reference provides an overview of writing and presentation requirements for presenters/authors.

Speaker Virtual MeetingsThe IIBEC Team will hold two virtual meetings with presenters/authors to share important information and answer questions.  

  • 6/13/23: Presenter/Author Content Development Meeting
  • 9/20/23: Presenter On-Site Logistics Meeting

Meeting invitations will be sent via email.

Articles

Guidelines for Submission: Articles must follow the guidelines for submission.

General Reminders

  • Word Limit: Articles should be no more than 2500 words.
  • Images/figures:
    – A maximum of 5 images/figures may be included
    – Images must be embedded into the paper/article at the time of submission
    – Submitting authors are responsible for including any required citations 

Presentations & Assessment Questions

PowerPoint Presentation Template:  Presentations must be submitted using this template.  Formatting requirements are outlined in this template.
Media Guidelines: Please refer to the PowerPoint Presentation Template for guidelines regarding media within presentations.

Assessment Question Template and Writing Guide:  10 multiple-choice assessment questions are required to be submitted for each session. This reference outlines requirements and best practices for multiple-choice question writing.

Session Audio Visual Speaker Guidelines: This document outlines specific information/guidelines regarding session A/V.

Miscellaneous References & Reminders

Speaker Agreement:  Attestation to this agreement was required at the time of the abstract submission process.

AV Release: Attestation to this agreement was required at the time of the abstract submission process.

Registration:

  • IIBEC provides complimentary registration for up to two (2) speakers per session.
  • Information regarding the event registration process will be communicated to session presenters.
  • IIBEC is not responsible for any travel, lodging, meals, or transportation costs to and/or from the event for session author(s)/speaker(s).

Speaker Changes: Speaker additions or changes will NOT be accepted after 90 days prior to the event.

Fall Foundations’ Golf Outing

This year, the RCI-IIBEC Foundation and RCI Foundation Canada will be hosting a very special golf tournament on Thursday, September 28, at the Rosen Shingle Creek Golf Course in Orlando, Florida. The format will be a four-person scramble, $250 cost per golfer and will include golf fee with cart, breakfast bar, lunch, drinks, and beverage cart service. All proceeds from the event will support student programs through the RCI-IIBEC Foundation and RCI Foundation Canada. Outing will be limited to 50 participants.

Cash prizes for the first and last place foursomes, longest drive, and closest to pin.

About the Rosen Shingle Course

Arnold Palmer’s legacy is stronger than ever at Shingle Creek Golf Club at Rosen Shingle Creek. Indeed, four years after the sports legend passed away, we are proud to be showcasing a Palmer-inspired golf course.

It is golf reinvented, with the classic Arnold Palmer touch. It is legendary and far from the typical. It is Shingle Creek Golf Club.

Designed by the renowned Arnold Palmer Design Company, the Palmer legacy is found in a handcrafted course with design features reminiscent of the finest classics in the world. Strategy and variety are front and center with some of the course’s features to harken back to the golden age of golf course design. Elevated greens and strategically placed bunkers are surrounded by enchanting flora and wildlife. Green complexes with fairway-cut surrounds or runoff areas give golfers of all levels more forgiveness and entertaining strategic options. Explore the championship course that challenges your entire game, yet rewards the diligent player.